Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. v-vi

CONTENTS

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

ILLUSTRATIONS

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

read more

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xiv

William Butler Yeats once said one must labor to be beautiful. I no longer deny I am a worker bee. I like the activity and anonymity that happens when I am immersed in a project I enjoy. Of all the bees, my favorite is the forager, the bee that finds flowers in the fields, collects dusty pollen and nectar, and carries these raw materials back to the hive to be turned...

Part One: Hiving Off from Europe

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-2

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 3-18

Von Frisch’s question has haunted me throughout the process of compiling this book. For those interested in how to keep bees, many fine writers already exist. For those who want to read about the joys of beekeeping,better books than this one are already on the market. Even scientists and researchers have found an appreciative general audience. Von Frisch ...

read more

Chapter 1: Bees and New World Colonialism

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 19-38

European settlers often quoted this biblical phrase to justify their colonization efforts. As long as settlers had cattle and bees, they could be assured of the basic essentials—food, wax, medicine, candles, and clothing. So powerful was the Bible verse that even though cattle and honey bees did not exist in North America, colonizers envisioned the New World...

Part Two: Establishing a New Colony

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 39-40

read more

Chapter 2: Bees and the Revolution

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 41-62

Eighteenth-century America is noted for three interrelated but complex processes: European immigration, frontier migration, and political independence from England. Just as eighteenth-century American society was an intersection of ethnicities, so too was the honey bee a symbol for intersecting, and at times conflicting, values. European immigration had...

Part Three: Swarming West during the Nineteenth Century

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 63-64

read more

Chapter 3: Before Bee Space 1801-1860

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 80-100

American beekeeping history is generally divided into two periods: before and after Lorenzo Langstroth. Before Langstroth little was known about how the bee colony functioned. American beekeepers were at the mercy of two phenomena: a disease known as foulbrood and the bees’ natural instinct to swarm. Once Langstroth invented a hive that was...

read more

Chapter 4: After Bee Space 1860-1900

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 101-142

Compared to honey, sugar always has been a more political commodity, but especially in nineteenth-century America. Until that time, Americans had relied on the sugarcane industry (which had been profitable because of slaves) to serve its collective sweet tooth and had neglected to address the conflict between democratic principles and chattel slavery....

Part Four: Requeening a Global Hive

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 143-144

read more

Chapter 5: Early Twentieth Century: Industrialization, 1901–1949

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 145-198

For much of the early twentieth century, America was balanced between a pastoral ideal of sustainable agriculture and an emerging commitment to a new form of agriculture that would characterize twentieth-century America. The two ancient symbols of sustenance—bees and cattle—were in forty-eight states as well as in the territories of Alaska and Hawaii. A...

read more

Chapter 6: Late Twentieth Century: Globalization, 1950–2000

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 199-250

Almond trees dot the California valley like Degas ballerinas. The limbs, pruned precisely so that sunlight will strike the middle of the trunks, fan out like pink tutus. The blossoms have a dusky, dusty scent so thick it is almost cloying. Almost. Little did Franciscan priest Junipero Serra know how the almond trees he brought with him to California in 1767 would...

read more

Epilogue

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 251-262

In Hawaii, Michael Kliks, owner of the Manoa Honey Company, and his assistant Keoki Espiritu have invited me to see their hives on Oahu. We don bee veils and jackets, the garments setting each of us in relief against the smoky cloud-covered mountain. The pink jasmine vines threaten to overtake us. Tall banana trees shade the hives, a colorful...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 263-292

Glossary

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 293-296

Dramatis Personae

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 297-300

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 301-316

Permissions

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 317-318

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 319-335