Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-vi

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-x

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xiv

The writing of this book has benefi ted from the kindness, time, and backing of so many individuals. Thank you to Charlotte O’Kelly for your mentorship over the years. Thank you to Rebecca Bach for being a great source of support and wisdom. I thank Kim Blankenship, Linda Burton, Phil Morgan, and Emilio Parrado for your encouragement and helpful skepticism. This project was a large undertaking, and because of your expert...

read more

CHAPTER 1 Inside Creekridge Park

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-21

Creekridge Park is an urban, multiethnic, and mixed- income neighborhood in Durham, North Carolina (see map 1).¹ During the fall of 2010, the Creekridge Park Neighborhood Association (CPNA) once again held its annual picnic at the home of Burt, a White homeowner and established resident, on Harris Street.² Temperatures in the low seventies and clear skies made it a perfect day for a picnic. The main purpose of this gathering was holding the CPNA board elections. Burt has a covered garage with...

read more

CHAPTER 2 White Habitus and the Meanings of Diversity

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 22-58

Debbie and Sharon’s characterizations of a diverse Creekridge Park area contribute important insights into the neighborhood’s white, urban, middle- class habitus. Diversity across multiple axes is a prominent aspect of Creekridge Park for White residents, particularly homeowners. In this chapter I analyze White residents’ defi nitions of diversity and the centrality...

read more

CHAPTER 3 Neighboring from a Distance

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 59-93

The more time I spent in Creekridge Park, the more apparent the practices of the white, urban, middle- class habitus became. In the epigraph, Luke, a newcomer on Colony Street, highlights an important aspect of life in Creekridge Park: White homeowners, many of whom are recent additions to the neighborhood, not only assume they are entitled to set the norms of the neighborhood but, because of race and class privilege, are able to do so....

read more

CHAPTER 4 Creekridge Park in Black and Brown

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 94-147

Mary’s quotation introduces us to a central concern of this chapter. Mary, a Black longtime resident, was responding to one of my standard interview questions: The neighborhood association claims that the neighborhood is mixed income and diverse; do you think that is true? “Mixed income” and “diverse,” phrases commonly used in the sociological literature and newspaper articles on urban development and eagerly endorsed by White residents in...

read more

CHAPTER 5 Solving the Wrong Problem

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 148-154

In an insightful chapter about integrative housing eff orts, urban scholar Janet L. Smith asks “Are we trying to solve the wrong problem?” in response to the unconvincing evidence regarding poverty deconcentration programs such as Moving to Opportunity.¹ Based on data shared by the White, Black, and Latino/a residents of Creekridge Park, I similarly argue that scholars and policy makers focusing on proximity between racialethnic...

APPENDIX A: Researcher in the Field

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 155-164

APPENDIX B: Guide for In-depth Interviews

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 165-168

APPENDIX C: Interview Participant Demographics

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 169-172

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 173-182

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 183-190

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 191-193