Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

Field guides have always made me happy because they conjure up good thoughts of being in the field, the best place to really learn about nature and why I got into this field of marine biology in the first place. I have many field guides in my library, and I love thumbing through them...

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xiv

It takes many people and organizations to compile the necessary information, locate and photograph specimens, and find all the pertinent literature for a volume such as the Encyclopedia of Texas Seashells. Museum collections and the people who work with them are acknowledged...

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xv-xviii

Seashells have intrigued humans for eons, even before recorded history, as noted in prehistoric drawings and artifacts found all over the world. Seashells have been used as tools, containers, objects of adornment, fetishes, and even currency in early cultures. Chapter 1 in our Encyclopedia...

read more

1. Collecting Seashells

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-8

Many people start to collect shells by picking up seashells on a visit to the beach or perhaps land snails in their own backyard. Whether they immediately become interested in collecting shells or wait many years for another opportunity to visit the shore, they often want more shells...

read more

2. Seashell Characteristics

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 9-22

Seashells belong to the phylum Mollusca, one of the most diverse groups of animals, second only to the arthropods. Estimates of the diversity of living mollusks vary from 52,525 to more than 200,000 species; most authors accept an intermediary figure. However, recent studies suggest...

read more

3. Common Texas Seashells

This chapter describes a total of 300 species of commonly found Texas seashells and illustrates them with more than 600 photographs. These descriptions and photographs are excerpted from our larger book Encyclopedia of Texas Seashells, and we refer the reader or user of this...

read more

Part I. Class: Polyplacophora: Chitons

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 25-28

The class Polyplacophora, commonly known as chitons, is made up of about 900 species worldwide. Chitons are most commonly found on rocky coastlines, like those of the western United States, where there are many species. Chitons are bilaterally symmetrical marine mollusks...

read more

Part II. Class: Gastropoda: Snails, Conchs, and Whelks

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 29-140

At 70,000 living species worldwide there are more gastropods than any other class of mollusks. They are very diverse and numerous. Gastropods range from the primitive deep-water marine species to the complex air-breathing...

read more

Part III. Class: Cephalopoda: Squids and Octopuses

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 141-146

The class Cephalopoda is made up of about 900 species and 2 subclasses, Nautiloidea and Coleoidea. Nautiloids are chambered and coiled; they lack suckers, and Nautilus is the only extant genus with an outer shell. Coleoids begin with an inner shell...

read more

Part IV. Class: Bivalvia: Oysters, Mussels, and Clams

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 147-236

The class Bivalvia includes mussels, oysters, scallops, and clams. This class of mollusks is named for the 2-shelled valves that protect the soft parts of the animal. Bivalves are an important part of the benthic community and...

read more

Part V. Class: Scaphopoda: Tuskshells

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 237-238

Scaphopoda is a relatively small class of burrowing mollusks of approximately 350 species, commonly known as toothshells or tuskshells. Scaphopods are cosmopolitan benthic carnivores. The tubular shell is sturdy, long, curved, tapered, and open at both ends. In their natural habitat they lie with the wider end, or...

Glossary

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 239-246

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 247-250

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 251-278

Back Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF