Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Table of Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. viii-ix

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. x-xi

read more

1. Introduction: Chaucer's (Anti-)Eroticisms and the Queer Middle Ages

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-29

Courtly knights and horny clerks, chaste young virgins and lecherous old wives, randy chickens and amorous planets: eroticism circulates throughout Geoffrey Chaucer’s corpus, and as his characters pursue the fruition of their desires, they demonstrate...

read more

2. Mutual Masochism and the Hermaphroditic Courtly Lady in Chaucer's Franklin's Tale

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 30-64

“The best part of married life is the fights. The rest is merely so-so,” writes Thornton Wilder in The Matchmaker,1 with his words capturing a simple truth of narrative pleasure: in many instances, readers prefer depictions of conflict over...

read more

3. "For to Be Sworne Bretheren Til They Deye": Satirizing Queer Brotherhood in the Chaucerian Corpus

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 65-97

In Chaucer’s canon, when a man swears an oath of brotherhood to another man, the vow is soon repudiated, rejected, or otherwise rendered problematic.1 No exceptions to this rule appear. Fraternal promises in Chaucer’s literature evoke homosocial tensions...

read more

4. Necrotic Erotics in Chaucerian Romance: Loving Women, Loving Death, and Destroying Civilization in the Knight's Tale and Troilus and Criseyde

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 98-126

To distill the genre of medieval romance to its core, a knight defeats his enemy so that he may love his lady, thus laying the foundation for the perpetuation of his bloodline through procreation. In his classic study Mimesis, Erich Auerbach succinctly...

read more

5. Queer Families in the Canterbury Tales: Fathers, Children, and Abusive Erotics

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 127-168

Surely D. S. Brewer is correct in his assertion, “Love of children is one of the orthodoxies of human nature which Chaucer takes for granted.”1 The evidence for his interpretation abounds: Griselda’s multiple swoons upon reuniting with her lost children...

read more

6. Chaucer's (Anti-)Erotic God

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 169-203

The New Testament proclaims, “Deus caritas est et qui manet in caritate in Deo manet et Deus in eo” (I John 4:16; “God is charity: and he that abideth in charity, abideth in God, and God in him”), but defining, contemplating, and making God’s...

read more

7. Epilogue: Chaucer's Avian Amorousness

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 204-216

As the previous chapters have explored, few of Chaucer’s human characters succeed in the erotic sphere without vexed sacrifices of self and desire, and so it is intriguing to consider the implications behind the rooster Chauntecleer’s depiction in...

Works Cited

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 217-236

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 237-242

Other Titles in the Series

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Back Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF