Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

read more

Foreword: To Inhabit a World

David Pettigrew

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xvi

One is able to discern a certain trajectory in the work of Jean-Luc Nancy, from a thinking of community to a thinking of world, a trajectory that can be said to begin with his text The Inoperative Community,1 which first appeared in French in 1986, and which culminates in this new book, What’s These...

read more

Translators' Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xvii-xxiv

Droughts and floods. Stagnant wages and unpayable mortgages. Modified food. “Socialist” presidents! “Citizenship” and “marriage” for everyone?! The world as we know it is crumbling. What will replace it seems more uncertain than ever. How did it come to this?! Dans quels mondes vivons-nous?! What’s

read more

Preamble

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-7

The world—this term so broad and imprecise, while also polysemous—is undergoing three transformations of far-reaching importance. It can no longer be represented today as a “cosmos” (the ordering of a well-composed set or ensemble). It is now devoid of any manageable and definite...

read more

More Than One

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 8-20

One, two, and the resumption of this division and this addition. This resumption counts for one more, which makes three. The two divides the one and supplants and supplements it: the one has not taken place; it has only taken place by redoubling and repeating itself.
The “abyss of representation” is the nonpresence that is performed again...

read more

Less Than One, Then

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 21-41

The one as a pure singular, an ontic unicity, a primary principle, a decreed edict, an identity unto itself, or an incorruptible [imprescriptible] archē or timeless principle has therefore not taken place. It has never even begun to take place. It must be that the knell [glas] rings for the one’s fantasy (its...

read more

Of Struction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 42-58

Technology1 supplants and supplements nature. It comes to supplant or take the place of nature wherever nature does not provide certain ends (such as a house or a bed), and it comes to supplement nature when it adds itself onto nature’s ends and means. This twofold value is what Derrida inscribes into...

read more

. . . And of Unistruction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 59-88

What is revealed upon uncovering these architectural and then structural paradigms is first and foremost the great Western passion for order.2 The worship of the assemblage, the adoration of the organized, the cult of classification. Of course, it is always possible to read and reread the tradition...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 89-104