Cover

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Title page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

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Introduction: Into the City: The Changing Faces of Rome

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pp. 1-18

People rarely think about what a miracle a city is. The city of Rome, the original urbs, is a living miracle, incorporating opposite extremes of almost everything human beings have ever produced. Its endless and timeless beauty persists side by side with urban degeneration, pollution, and crime proliferation in some of Europe’s most desolate city areas, often built illegally. The warmth and openness...

Part I. Rome: The Local and the Global City

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1 Diversely Global Rome

Bjørn Thomassen and Piero Vereni

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pp. 21-34

In Rome today, native-born Italians rub shoulders in daily life with immigrants from wildly different origins: Romanians and eastern Europeans who work in construction; Chinese men (and some women) running garment shops at the market of Piazza Vittorio; Bangladeshis working in restaurants and phone centers. In a new twist on the history of European colonialism, nuns from the Missionaries...

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2 The liberal, the Neoliberal, and the Illiberal: Dynamics of Diversity and Politics of Identity in Contemporary Rome

Michael Herzfeld

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pp. 35-47

The ascent to power of Pope Pius IX anticipates in many ways the paradoxical status of the Eternal City. Hailed as a liberator (and, more to the point, as a liberal), he soon demonstrated his repressively conservative and antirevolutionary colors and is now principally remembered as a cruel tyrant who authorized a virtual orgy of executions in the desperate and ultimately unsuccessful attempt to perpetuate Vatican control of Rome. His motives were not those of the Greek...

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3 Rome as a Global City: Mapping New Cultural and Political Boundaries

Pierluigi Cervelli (translated by Isabella Clough Marinaro)

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pp. 48-61

The analysis presented in this chapter is the result of a research project concerning the use of space in Rome by men and women belonging to various immigrant groups: Chinese, Bangladeshi, Romanian, Albanian, and Roma. Their “spatial practices”1 appear to be based on an ability to innovatively and strategically interpret the relationships between areas which developed out of the sociopolitical model of urban space defined by Fascism—a model which outlived the regime...

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4 Housing and Homelessness in Contemporary Rome

Pierpaolo Mudu

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pp. 62-78

The history of contemporary Rome is one of urban development led predominantly by private interests which have caused an enormous burden of social conflict (Insolera 1993; Berdini 2008). In order to understand this development it is necessary to be familiar with a range of recurrent terms such as borgate, borghetti, palazzinari, abusivismo, and condono that describe important features in the evolution of the city’s housing market. Since 1870, Rome’s demographic growth...

Part II. Changing Faces, Changing Places

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5 Torpignattara/Banglatown: Processes of Reurbanization and Rhetorics of Locality in a Suburb of Rome

Alessandra Broccolini (translated by Jennifer Radice)

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pp. 81-98

One winter morning in 2010, I was strolling along a street in the Torpignattara neighborhood on the outskirts of Rome, where I have been engaged for some years in an ethnographic study of the Bangladeshi community in the area, when I saw a piece of plastic that had been taken from the rebuilding of a phone center and fixed to a wall. Someone unknown, who obviously wanted to annoy the Bangladeshi community, had written on the piece of plastic the name of a nonexistent...

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6 Foreign Pupils, Bad Citizens: The public Construction of Difference in a Roman school

Piero Vereni (translated by Jennifer Radice)

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pp. 99-113

A precise quantification of the presence of foreigners seems to be one of the main worries of Italian political institutions. “How many are they?” is a common question even in public schools. The Ministry of Education considers it extremely important to set apart Italian pupils from those “of non-Italian citizenship” independently of their actual linguistic competence and their level of socioeconomic integration (Miur-Ismu 2011a, 2011b). This quantitative attitude certainly...

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7 Evicting Rome's Undesirables: Two Short Tales

Isabella Clough Marinaro and Ulderico Daniele

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pp. 114-128

Global Rome’s identity today is not only fashioned by the flows of people who use it and move through it, but also by the migrants who have made it their home. Tourists, diplomats, and religious personnel, as well as refugees and economic migrants, contribute to the divides between extreme wealth and power and extreme poverty which are part of the specific global identity of the Eternal City. From a broader temporal perspective, Rome’s recent history as capital has...

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8 The Rootedness of a Community of Xoraxané Roma in Rome

Marco Solimene (translated by Jennifer Radice)

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pp. 129-142

Roma groups who originally came from Yugoslavia have been present in the Rome area for decades.1 Some settlements (for example, the Casilino 900 or Via Candoni camps)2 represent historically constituent elements of the outskirts of Rome, but a considerable number of Roma are to be found in small and transient settlements, dispersed among the interstices of the urban area and in spaces left empty by the people and institutions of Rome (see also Cervelli, chapter 3). The...

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9 Ways of Living in the Market City: Bufalotta and the Porta di Roma Shopping Center

Carlo Cellamare (translated by Jennifer Radice)

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pp. 143-156

An important and entirely new feature of recent urban development in Rome is the creation of several large conglomerations, mostly placed along the GRA (the Grande Raccordo Anulare or ring road) or near the main roads and motorways. These conglomerations have come into being primarily with the creation of large shopping complexes, often connected to extensive residential areas. There are now more than twenty-eight large malls...

Part III. Rome and Its Fractured Modernities

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10 Roma, Città Sportiva

Simon Martin

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pp. 159-171

Sports and sporting events have played a crucial role in shaping Rome, stimulating major transformations in urban planning and the evolution of the cityscape throughout its history. One of the largest urban footprints was left upon the city by the 1960 Olympic Games, which resulted in infrastructural changes and planning decisions that continue to resonate in the capital and among its inhabitants. As Rome prepared its bid to host the 2020 Olympic Games, the question...

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11 Football, Romanità, and the Search for Stasis

Mark Dyal

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pp. 172-184

Rome is a city whose past is rich in images of warfare, conquest, and glory. From Virgil’s proclamation that the Romans were a people predetermined to rule the world, to Mussolini’s desire to reestablish Roman control of the Mediterranean, the idea that Rome and glory are interrelated has a long history. In contemporary Rome, it is an idea that has been adopted by the fans of the city’s football teams. As Associazione Sportiva Roma (AS Roma) and Società Sportiva Lazio (SS Lazio)...

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12 Rome's Contemporary Past

Valerie Higgins

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pp. 185-202

Is Rome’s ancient past a blessing or a curse? This may seem a strange question to ask seeing that classical heritage is an essential part of the identity of the city and revenue from cultural tourism underpins its economy. On the other hand, its patrimony can also be seen as a block to development and an insurmountable obstacle to Rome taking its place as a dynamic twenty-first-century global city. During the twentieth century, there was a conservative approach to cultural...

Part IV. The Informal City

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13 The Self-Made City

Carlo Cellamare (translated by Jennifer Radice)

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pp. 205-218

Nearly 30 percent of the city of Rome has been built illegally and the phenomenon is in constant development. Numerous forms of squatting, mostly of housing, are to be found throughout the city; similarly, there are widespread areas, some more marginal than others, under self-management and self-organization. Still more widespread are the misappropriations (and reappropriations) of the built environment by the city’s inhabitants. In many respects Rome, acknowledged...

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14 Marginal Centers: Learning from Rome's Periphery

Ferruccio Trabalzi

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pp. 219-231

Finis terrae, meaning “end of the earth” in Latin, is our starting point for the story of Idroscalo: an informal, illegal, self-built multicultural neighborhood located where the mouth of the Tiber River meets the Mediterranean Sea. An agglomeration of about three hundred homes in varying conditions of conservation and of uncertain aesthetics, Idroscalo has grown amid the benign neglect of all political coalitions that have governed Rome since the early 1960s. Idroscalo and...

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15 Residence Roma: Senegalese Immigrants in a Vertical Village

Cristina Lombardi-Diop

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pp. 232-245

This chapter examines the dwelling practices that Senegalese immigrants devised—in one specific location in the city of Rome—as an attempt to respond to the failure of the capital’s integration policies. The site under consideration is Residence Roma, a residential building in the neighborhood of Forte Bravetta, located in the northern outskirts of Rome’s XVI municipality, where over two thousand immigrants lived between 2001 and 2006. Among them were at least...

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16 where is Culture in Rome? Self-Managed Social Centers and the Right to Urban Space

Pierpaolo Mudu

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pp. 246-264

In Rome, the construction of political spaces has changed significantly due to transformations in the social composition of the population and the development of the city. During the last twenty-five years, many abandoned buildings have been converted to self-managed social centers by leftist activists and other diverse groups. A social center is a space which originates through squatting an abandoned place, within which people experiment with forms of noninstitutional...

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17 Greening Rome: Rediscovering Urban Agriculture

Ferruccio Trabalzi

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pp. 265-280

As in many other cities in the world, urban gardening and farming are gaining space and relevance in Rome. Community gardens, vegetable gardens, playgrounds with a garden attached, cultivated tracts along the Tiber River and places in between buildings, under freeways in the periphery and in urban parks are slowly revitalizing abandoned or underutilized areas of the city and bringing them back into the public arena. The city is not new to urban farming. Vineyards...

Contributors

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pp. 281-282

Index

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pp. 283-298