Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-viii

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Introduction

Robert Lindley Towery

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pp. ix-xii

Robert Towery was the original author of this unique biography. Sadly, he passed away on October 29, 2010, before he was able to complete his vision. I had known Robert since I was eleven years old, when he drafted my...

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Chapter 1: A Point in Time

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pp. 1-5

On February 13, 1922, Chester Hogan boarded the Frisco in Dublin, Texas, and rode the train seventy-five miles northeast to the Texas & Pacific rail station in Fort Worth. In an attempt to satisfy his wife...

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Chapter 2: Panther City to Cowtown to Boomtown

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pp. 6-12

One can’t discuss the Hogan family, their friends, supporters, customers, or their importance to Fort Worth without looking at the history and development of the city itself. It appears that three years in particular...

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Chapter 3: The Early Years

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pp. 13-22

Chester Hogan was twenty-three and Clara Williams Hogan was only eighteen when they started having children. Their first child was born in Dublin, Texas, on April 25, 1907. She was a pretty little girl...

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Chapter 4: Two Brothers Come of Age

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pp. 23-35

As they were pursuing business and golf, the two brothers also became interested in their social lives. During their early teen years, Clara, or “Mama Hogan,” had enrolled Royal, Ben, and their older sister...

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Chapter 5: Mr. Marvin

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pp. 36-45

After WWI, with the continuing discoveries of oil in West Texas and Oklahoma, Fort Worth became a center for the various petroleum industries that were exploring and drilling for “black gold.” Dallas...

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Chapter 6: Family Golf

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pp. 46-56

Royal and Ben were among the first one hundred members to join Colonial. Up to this time, Royal was beating Ben regularly when they played together, and that challenge drove Ben to work even harder on...

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Chapter 7: "This Thing is Legendary"

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pp. 57-67

In 1896, a Fort Worth area rancher named Charles McFarland and the marketing manager for the Fort Worth Stockyards, Charles French, were talking about the growing cattle business in Cowtown, and they...

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Chapter 8: The War Years

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pp. 68-79

The first couple of years during the 1940s were especially good times for the Hogan brothers. Royal’s business was booming, and Ben was winning tournaments. Ben Hogan had paired with Vic...

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Chapter 9: Near-Fatal Accident

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pp. 80-88

Ben won the Bing Crosby Invitational to start 1949 off right, and then he defeated good friend and four-ball partner, Jimmy Demaret, in a playoff to win the Long Beach Open. Before regular commercial air...

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Chapter 10: "His Legs Weren't Strong Enough to Carry his Heart"

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pp. 89-104

Ben had spent two months in the Hotel Dieu Hospital—a significant part of that time in what amounted to a full body cast. Nobody but his wife, his brother, and Marvin Leonard believed he had the...

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Chapter 11: "If Used in an Office, We Have It!"

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pp. 105-125

In 1943, Royal Hogan celebrated the eighth anniversary of his Fort Worth Office Supply Company with his store’s most profitable year. His young company had survived the Depression and had grown every year of...

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Chapter 12: The Hogan Slam

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pp. 126-132

In 1952, Ben continued to experience a lot of pain in his legs, so he cut back his schedule and entered only three of the tour’s seventy-two-hole tournaments—the Masters, the Colonial NIT, and the US Open at...

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Chapter 13: The Ben Hogan Company

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pp. 133-143

After the Manhattan ticker-tape parade, Ben and Valerie planned to fly from New York City to Dallas’s Love Field. They changed their plans, however, and landed at Carter Field in Fort Worth after a...

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Chapter 14: Shady Oaks and the Hogan Brothers

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pp. 144-157

At some point after Marvin Leonard had sold Colonial Country Club to its members in 1942, he began dreaming of building another golf course. Marvin’s friend Amon Carter, the publisher of the Fort...

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Chapter 15: "Golf is Played with White Balls"

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pp. 158-174

In 1983, Royal turned seventy-four years old and Ben seventy-one, and though both brothers hadn’t played tournament golf, amateur or professional, since 1971, they continued to make daily appearances at...

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Chapter 16: The Final Years

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pp. 175-193

Jacque and her father became estranged in the summer of 1991. Royal had severed all contact with his daughter, so that her previous duties and responsibilities in caring for him were a thing of the past...

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Appendix: Hogan Family Ancestry

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pp. 194-202

JACQUELINE HOGAN TOWERY IS THE last of her family to be known by the name of Hogan. Jacque’s only sibling was her younger brother, Royal Dean Hogan Jr., who died too young, before he ever had...

Bibliography

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pp. 203-204

Index

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pp. 205-209