Cover

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Frontmatter

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Contents

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p. v

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Preface

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pp. vii-xiii

This book has its genesis in two sets of experiences. The first was the opportunity to undertake research with colleagues at the University of Tennessee and other institutions on the problems faced by the Southeast in providing an abundant, dependable water supply to sustain its frenetic pace of growth and peerless ecological bounty. Started in the late 1990s, this research has encompassed the study of conflicts involving...

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1 Water and Sustainability: Facing the Challenges

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pp. 1-32

Water is the economic, social, and cultural lifeblood of humanity. Clean, abundant water provides the basis for agriculture, industry, commerce and transportation, energy production, and recreation. More importantly, it is the basis for life itself, as the great diversity of our planet’s flora and fauna attests. Despite its vital significance to our lives, however, population growth, urban development and sprawl,...

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2 U.S. and International Water Resource Management Efforts: Legacy and Lessons

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pp. 33-99

Kenney and Lord (1994) have identified several coordinating mechanisms for managing interstate streams in the United States on a comprehensive basis. These include compacts, interstate commissions, and semiprivate/semipublic innovations (for instance, government corporations such as Tennessee Valley Authority, or TVA). Some of these innovations are utilized on intra-state rivers as well. Four coordinating mechanisms...

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3 Five U.S. River Basin Initiatives: Case Studies in Search of Sustainable Development

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pp. 100-175

This chapter discusses five U.S. river basin management initiatives. These cases are used to assess various institutional, political, ecological, economic, and ethical conditions that lend themselves to or detract from sustainable water management. Three initiatives are formally chartered river basin commissions (RBCs), the Delaware RBC in Delaware, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania; the Susquehanna RBC in...

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4 Water Quality and Quantity: The Critical Interface

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pp. 176-234

This chapter examines the relationship among water quality, water supply, and sustainable development. Two issues are central: the difficulty in maintaining water supplies that are safe for people and other life and the challenge of ensuring adequate surface water flow in lakes, rivers, and streams to provide a sufficient water to sustain fish, wildlife, and...

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5 Toward Sound Ethical Alternatives for Water Resources Management

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pp. 235-269

In this chapter we show that while it is essential that policymakers embrace the elements of sustainable development for water management we have been discussing, there should be more attention paid to the ethical basis of water resources administration in order to achieve adaptive management. In a previous book (Feldman 1995) I argued that sound ethics are important to water...

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6 Water Resources Management as an Adaptive Process

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pp. 270-313

The purpose of this chapter is twofold. First, we want to draw together the key components of an adaptive management framework for water resources policy in a useful summary that focuses on the four policy needs advanced in the book’s introduction. These are: encouraging social learning, drawing upon local or indigenous knowledge of water problems and independently validated scientific information, conforming the structure...

Appendix. River Basin Initiative Survey

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pp. 315-318

Notes

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pp. 319-330

Bibliography

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pp. 331-360

Index

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pp. 361-371