Cover

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Title Page, Frontispiece, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Table of Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

This monograph came into being during my year as a Eurias Senior Fellow at the Netherlands Institute for Advanced Studies, 2011–12. My heartfelt thanks to the Eurias Fellowship Program and to everyone at NIAS, a place of perfect tranquillity and stimulating intellectual exchange, not to mention spectacular cuisine, for making that year possible. In addition to the warm, competent...

Note on Translations and Manuscripts

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pp. xi-xii

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Prologue

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pp. 1-10

Th e feud between the Orleanists, or Armagnacs, and Burgundians, that “sickness that so tears through the land” brought on by mad King Charles VI’s inability to reign, is a central theme in Christine de Pizan’s corpus.1 An observer of the strife, Christine laments the confl ict’s devastating material eff ects on her society throughout her career....

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Chapter 1: Christine and the Armagnac-Burgundian Feud: Regency and Kingship

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pp. 11-29

The sun had not yet risen on May 29, 1418, when Perrinet Leclerc unlocked the Porte Saint Germain with keys pilfered from his father’s bedside.1 Waiting outside was the Burgundian Jean de Villiers Seigneur de L’Isle-Adam, accompanied by a group of several hundred mounted men armed for battle. They burst through the gate, heading toward Châtelet. When the last had entered,...

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Chapter 2: The Beginnings of the Feud and Christine’s Political Poetry, 1393–1401

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pp. 30-62

The dukes’ rivalry is mentioned explicitly for the first time in 1401. Pintoin describes the dukes as barely able to conceal their animosity for each other. Their competition was aggravated by courtiers, he continues, who themselves were locked into “the constant excessively jealous and stubborn struggle for superiority . . . ceaselessly attempted through spouting flattery to...

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Chapter 3: The Point of No Return and the Political Allegories, 1401–1404

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pp. 63-94

By 1401, Philip of Burgundy and Louis of Orleans were opposed on every issue of the day.1 First, England. The Truce of Paris, sealed by the marriage between King Richard II of England and the seven-year-old French royal princess Isabelle in 1396, initiated a quiet period, which was broken in 1399 when the Lancastrians deposed and incarcerated Richard II in favor of Henry...

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Chapter 4: Jean of Burgundy and Reconfiguring Regency, 1405

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pp. 95-120

Having secured the succession of Brabant from the duchy’s estates for his son, Antoine, Philip of Burgundy traveled to Brussels, where the nearly eighty-two-year-old Jeanne of Brabant handed the government over to him. There, Philip was stricken with the plague and, not wanting to impose on the hospitality of Jeanne for care, headed for Arras, but made it only to Halle before he...

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Chapter 5: Reading Toward Showdown and the Prose Treatises, 1405–1407

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pp. 121-145

Although the peace treaty between the dukes, signed on October 16, 1405, had headed off bloodshed, it offered a short reprieve. The impact of Jean’s coup attempt was significant, Bertrand Schnerb explains. In occupying Paris and its surrounding areas for more than two months, the Duke of Burgundy had shown his serious intent and proved his support in the capital, lending...

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Chapter 6: The Great Feud, After 1407

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pp. 146-172

On November 20, 1407, the Duke of Berry brought the dukes of Orleans and Burgundy together to hear Mass. Immediately beforehand, the two had pledged to live in love and brotherhood. But, as Juvénal des Ursins notes ominously, “This did not last.”1 On November 23, the Duke of Orleans dined with the queen in her Hotel Barbette, located in what is today the third...

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Epilogue

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pp. 173-178

Christine fled Paris either during the Burgundian massacre or soon afterward, taking refuge in a convent, possibly the Dominican priory at Poissy, home of her beloved daughter, though no one knows for sure.1 Although she lived for another thirteen years or so, she composed only two more known works. The first was the...

Notes

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pp. 179-200

Bibliography

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pp. 201-216

Index

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pp. 217-220

Back Cover

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