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summary
Christopher Hamlin’s magisterial work engages a common experience—fever—in all its varieties and meanings. Reviewing the representations of that condition from ancient times to the present, More Than Hot is a history of the world through the lens of fever. The book deals with the expression of fever, with the efforts of medical scientists to classify it, and with fever’s changing social, cultural, and political significance. Long before there were thermometers to measure it, people recognized fever as a dangerous if transitory state of being. It was the most familiar form of alienation from the normal self, a concern to communities and states as well as to victims, families, and healers. The earliest medical writers struggled for a conceptual vocabulary to explain fever. During the Enlightenment, the idea of fever became a means to acknowledge the biological experiences that united humans. A century later, in the age of imperialism, it would become a key element of conquest, both an important way of differentiating places and races, and of imposing global expectations of health. Ultimately the concept would split: "fevers" were dangerous and often exotic epidemic diseases, while “fever” remained a curious physiological state, certainly distressing but usually benign. By the end of the twentieth century, that divergence divided the world between a global south profoundly affected by fevers—chiefly malaria—and a north where fever, now merely a symptom, was so medically trivial as to be transformed into a familiar motif of popular culture. A senior historian of science and medicine, Hamlin shares stories from individuals—some eminent, many forgotten—who exemplify aspects of fever: reflections of the fevered, for whom fevers, and especially the vivid hallucinations of delirium, were sometimes transformative; of those who cared for them (nurses and, often, mothers); and of those who sought to explain deadly epidemic outbreaks. Significant also are the arguments of the reformers, for whom fever stood as a proxy for manifold forms of injustice. Broad in scope and sweep, Hamlin’s study is a reflection of how the meanings of diseases continue to shift, affecting not only the identities we create but often also our ability to survive.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Series Page, Title Page, Copyright
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vi
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  1. Foreword
  2. Charles E. Rosenberg
  3. pp. vii-x
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xi-xii
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  1. Chapter 1. More Than HOT
  2. pp. 1-16
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  1. Part I. The Fevers of Classical Medicines
  2. pp. 17-22
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  1. Chapter 2. Words
  2. pp. 23-53
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  1. Chapter 3. Books
  2. pp. 54-88
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  1. Part II. Fever as Social
  2. pp. 89-92
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  1. Chapter 4. Communities
  2. pp. 93-124
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  1. Chapter 5. Selves
  2. pp. 125-164
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  1. Part III. Fever Becomes Modern
  2. pp. 165-166
  1. Chapter 6. Facts
  2. pp. 167-205
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  1. Chapter 7. Naming the Wild
  2. pp. 206-249
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  1. Chapter 8. Numbers and Nurses
  2. pp. 250-280
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  1. Part IV. Fever, Modern and Post-Modern
  2. pp. 281-284
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  1. Chapter 9. Machines, Mothers, Sex, and Zombies
  2. pp. 285-312
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 313-368
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 369-383
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Additional Information

ISBN
9781421415031
Related ISBN
9781421415024
MARC Record
OCLC
889953004
Pages
400
Launched on MUSE
2014-09-09
Language
English
Open Access
No
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