Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

Abbreviations for Frequently Cited Works

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pp. ix-xii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xiii-xvi

This book is an extended and updated version of the second edition of Bruno Latour zur Einführung, published with Junius Press in Hamburg in 2013 (1st ed., 2011). The themes and arguments developed in this book were first presented at the fifth Europe an Conference of the Society for Science, Literature, and the Arts (SLSA) in Berlin in 2008....

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Introduction

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pp. 1-8

Bruno Latour has many faces.1 He is known to many as an ethnographer of the world of everyday technology who in meticulous studies has shown how seemingly trivial things, like a key or a safety belt, actively intervene in our behavior. Others know Latour as an essayist very well versed in theory who charged the philosophers of postmodernity— principally Lyotard...

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1. Exegesis and Ethnology

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pp. 9-24

Beaune is one of France’s most famous and important wine centers. The small city in Burgundy is also the birthplace of two important scientists: in 1746 the mathematician Gaspard Monge, and in 1830 the physiologist Étienne-Jules Marey. Unsurprisingly for this region of the world, wine is one of the connecting links between Monge and Marey. Both scientists...

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2. A Philosopher in the Laboratory

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pp. 25-39

Latour’s next stop was the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, California. From October 1975 to August 1977, as a participating observer he collected the data on which Laboratory Life, the book he wrote with Steve Woolgar, was based— a pioneering study in the anthropology of science....

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3. Machines of Tradition

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pp. 40-53

Latour’s stay at the Salk Institute ended in August 1977. He then moved to Paris, to the Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers, to take up the position of assistant to Jean- Jacques Salomon, professor of “Technology and Society.” The Conservatoire is a venerable state institution of higher education dedicated to the advancement of science and industry, and Latour...

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4. Pandora and the History of Modernity

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pp. 54-67

“The first bachelor machine was Pandora,” wrote Jean-François Lyotard in his 1975 contribution to the cata logue of Harald Szeemann’s famous exhibition on the machines célibataires. In the text, which he later included in his book on Marcel Duchamp, Lyotard recounts his interpretation of the Greek myth: Zeus had commanded the creation of the first woman, Pandora,...

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5. Of Actants, Forces, and Things

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pp. 68-82

Latour’s conviction that Pasteur and his allies had “redefined the social link” was clearly the result of his focused analysis of late nineteenth-century biological and medical journals. Yet one can also read this statement as the consequence of a conscious decision with political undertones. Or at least this has been suggested by the British science historian Simon...

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6. Science and Action

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pp. 83-95

Around 1985 the Center for the Sociology of Innovation at the Écoles des Mines in Paris became the institutional basis of actor-network theory. Although “theory of the actor- network,” “actor- network theory,” or simply “ANT” did not become common currency until the early 1990s,1 the “author network” of actor-network theory had already formed several years...

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7. Questions Concerning Technology

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pp. 96-113

A complete change of scene: Berlin. It is the ninth of November 1989. A press conference is being held. At the front of the podium representatives of the government have taken their seats at a long table. In the middle is the “Secretary for Information”; the audience is the usual assortment of journalists....

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8. The Coming Parliament

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pp. 114-132

The last project that the American architect Louis Kahn worked on was a parliament building complex. It had been in planning since the early 1960s. While he was building the institute in La Jolla, California, for Jonas Salk, where a few years later Latour would conduct his ethnological studies for Laboratory Life, Kahn was already working on the plans for the National...

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Conclusion

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pp. 133-140

Bruno Latour aims to approach the material featured in his studies with radical openness and curiosity. We don’t know, he says, what a society is, what it consists of, and what holds it together.

We do not have to decide for ourselves what makes up our world, who are the agents “really” acting in it, or what is the quality of the proofs they impose upon...

Timeline

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pp. 141-144

Notes

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pp. 145-164

Bibliography

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pp. 165-166

Index

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pp. 167-178