Contents

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pp. ix-x

List of Illustrations and Maps

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pp. xi-xii

Preface

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pp. xiii-xiv

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One: Sometimes Bitter Friends

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pp. 1-41

To invoke the phrase “Rome and the barbarians” is to open a Pandora’s box of interpretation and suggestion: Rome, the city on the Tiber, the city of the Caesars, the holy City, the city of temples and churches, the quintessential symbol...

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Two: Recognition, Confrontation, and Coexistence

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pp. 42-87

In 121 B.C. Rome successfully concluded its wars against a coalition of Gauls in the lower Rhone valley, led by the victorious Quintus Fabius Maximus, consul, and Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus, consul from the preceding year and now proconsul of Rome. The conflict began...

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Three: Through Caesar’s Eyes

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pp. 88-139

Julius Caesar begins his commentaries on the Gallic war with one of the most familiar passages in all ancient literature: “Gallia est omnis divisa in partes tres, quarum unam incolunt Belgae, aliam Aquitani, tertiam qui ipsorum lingua Celtae, nostra Galli appellantur” (Gaul is one, divided into three parts: the Belgae inhabiting...

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Four: The Early Empire and the Barbarians: An Overview

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pp. 140-193

Caius Julius Caesar Octavianus, better known as Augustus, moved the Roman world away from the closely knit aristocratic world of the republic towards a vastly more complex empire. The goal of this chapter is the reverse of the one that went before. There we entered into the mind of the greatest Roman of his generation to explore how barbarians were treated in classical literature. Beneath the stereotype of...

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Five: Perspectives from Pannonia

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pp. 194-247

Roman Pannonia provides many opportunities to sharpen and expand upon some of the generalizations made in Chapter 4. It cannot be taken in complete isolation from other provinces and events, however, for with a limited number of forces available, Rome was forever “robbing Peter to pay Paul.” Sometimes...

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Six: The Barbarians and the “Crisis” of the Empire

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pp. 248-308

The trend towards centralization during the Principate could be symbolized by the emperor’s presence at the head of his armies in battle but was also apparent in the more mundane aspects of daily life in the empire. Little by little Romans had placed greater confidence in the central government rather...

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Seven: Barbarians and the Late Roman Empire

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pp. 309-373

The main features of the late Roman Empire were already apparent by the death of Diocletian in 305, but they continued to evolve throughout the following century and beyond. Except for Christianity, the contours of the late empire were most apparent along the frontiers. These trademarks included a...

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Epilogue

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pp. 374-384

The civil war between the courts of Honorius and Arcadius following the death of their father Theodosius I in 395 not only inaugurated a new phase of military and political development but accelerated the convergence of barbarian...

Appendix: Most Important Roman Emperors and Usurpers

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pp. 385-389

Notes

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pp. 391-430

Bibliography

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pp. 431-452

Index

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pp. 453-461