Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-viii

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Introduction

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pp. 1-24

The news of the ongoing and widespread human rights crises in Mexico is shocking even to hardened human rights workers. Over 60,000 people were killed in the drug war in the years 2006–2012. Hundreds of these killings involve beheadings or other gruesome mutilations and tortures often paraded prominently on the Internet...

Part I: Migration to the United States in Binational Context

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1. Reflections on Immigration, Binational Policies, and Human Rights Tragedies

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pp. 27-43

The fundamental premise of migration is economic. And the variables of the immigration equation between Mexico and the United States are an affluent and industrialized economy on one side and an undeveloped nation with a considerable labor supply on the other side, leading to a salary asymmetry that fuels migration...

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2. Sexual Violence Against Migrant Women and Children

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pp. 44-67

This chapter narrates another little-told story of human rights abuses along the U.S.- Mexico border: the sexual violence experienced by women and girls as they migrate into the United States, especially into Arizona through the northern Mexican state of Sonora...

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3. Immigration Enforcement at the U.S.- Mexico Border: Where Human Rights and National Sovereignty Collide

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pp. 68-88

In recent years there has been a tremendous expansion of U.S. immigration enforcement activities in the U.S.-Mexico border region, most notably by the U.S. Border Patrol, with the growing involvement of the military. This has been spurred by the strong anti-immigrant political sentiment in the United States directed largely at Hispanic (or Latino) immigrants...

Part II: The Mexican Drug War in Binational Context

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4. Politics of Death in the Drug War: The Right to Kill and Suspensions of Human Rights in Mexico, 2000–2012

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pp. 91-111

In November 2011, Mexican president Felipe Calderón stood accused of war crimes by a group of his own country’s citizens. Prominent Mexican lawyers, journalists, academics, and 23,000 petitioners filed a criminal complaint against him with the International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague...

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5. Migration, Violence, and “Security Primacy” at the Guatemala-Mexico Border

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pp. 112-126

Most international state borders are loci entangled in power disputes. This interplay may involve adjoining polities or may be about localized tensions among inhabitants of the border. External actors who are neither state-related nor resident frequently also play a role in such contested arenas...

Part III: Structural Violence and Civil Society in Ciudad Juárez

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6. The Binational Roots of the Femicides in Ciudad Juárez

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pp. 129-145

In approximately 1993, a series of grisly murders began to target poor, young women in the Mexican border town of Ciudad Juárez. Esther Cano Chávez, who ran the only shelter for battered women in Ciudad Juárez before her death, noted the treatment of victims as worthless, disposable women and characterized these deaths as feminicidos, or feminicides...

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7. Reflections on Antiviolence Civil Society Organizations in Ciudad Juárez

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pp. 146-162

The human rights situation in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, is staggering. In 2008, 1,656 murders were recorded, and these rose sharply to over 3,000 in 2010; 2011 saw a significant drop, but the murder rate remained frighteningly high, with over 1,900 dead...

Part IV: Transnational Activism and Human Rights

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8. The Persistence of Femicide amid Transnational Activist Networks

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pp. 165-180

Despite the often heard pronouncement that “women’s rights are human rights,” many women face stark and everyday threats to lives free of violence. In Mexico’s fifth largest city, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, bordering the United States, hundreds of women have been murdered since 1993, with over 80 killed in 2008...

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9. Transnational Advocacy for Human Rights in Contemporary Mexico

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pp. 181-201

Throughout the past six decades, as the international human rights regime has developed, as a growing number of international human rights nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) have emerged and consolidated, and as more countries have included the promotion and protection of human rights in their foreign policy objectives...

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10. Restrictions on U.S. Security Assistance and Their Limitations in Promoting Changes to the Human Rights Situation in Mexico

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pp. 202-220

At the outset of his administration in 2006, Mexican president Felipe Calderón launched a massive deployment of soldiers and federal police in counterdrug operations in several parts of the country while also implementing a series of initiatives to strengthen Mexico’s public security and justice institutions...

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Conclusion: Multiple States of Exception, Structural Violence, and Prospects for Change

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pp. 221-232

This volume has covered a range of human rights abuses and their binational causes. Indeed, the volume can be read as a sustained indictment of Mexican and U.S. policies on immigration, drug interdiction, gun possession, trade, and security for fueling human rights abuses, including the criminal violence perpetrated by cartels, bajadores, and other extralegal actors...

Notes

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pp. 233-250

References

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pp. 251-280

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List of Contributors

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pp. 281-284

Alejandro Anaya Muñoz is Associate Professor in the International Studies Division of the Center for Research and Teaching in Economics (Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas, CIDE)...

Index

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pp. 285-298

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Acknowledgments

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pp. 299-300

This volume has gestated over many years, and we are grateful for our many colleagues and friends who have supported us through this process. Dean Elizabeth Langland and Associate Dean Thomas J. Keil of the New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences at Arizona State University provided necessary funding and logistical support...