Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title page, Series page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-iv

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. v

The Contributors

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. vii

read more

Preface

Stephen Van Ever

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xi

During the 1980s an intense debate has arisen over American naval policy, focused on the Reagan administration's "Maritime Strategy." According to official statements, this strategy posits an aggressive global role for the U.S. Navy in the event of a conventional war with the Soviet Union, including early...

I: Naval Strategy

read more

Planning a Navy: The Risks of Conventional Wisdom

Linton F. Brooks

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 3-15

Keynes's principle—let us call it the principle of intellectual stagnation in the public service—has some important implications for naval forces, or at least for one conventional wisdom about naval forces. I say "one conventional wisdom" advisedly, because if there is one thing that has become clear in...

read more

Naval Power and National Security: The Case for the Maritime Strategy

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 16-46

For the past five years, U.S. Navy officers and their civilian colleagues have been taking to heart the centuries-old dictum of the first great theorist of conflict, Sun Tzu: they have been studying war. While military reformers...

read more

A Strategic Misstep: The Maritime Strategy and Deterrence in Europe

John F. Mearsheimer

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 47-101

A core element of the Reagan Administration's defense buildup lies in its plan to increase the size of the U.S. Navy to 600 ships.1 This 600-ship force is purportedly required to implement "The Maritime Strategy," which is the Navy's blueprint for fighting a global conventional war...

read more

Horizontal Escalation: Sour Notes of a Recurrent Theme

Joshua M. Epstein

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 102-114

The deterrence of Soviet military aggression has been the basis of American national security policy since the Truman Administration. The means proferred to secure containment, however, have changed with each administration...

read more

Naval Power and Soviet Global Strategy

Michael MccGwire

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 115-170

The Soviet Navy has become a significant factor in the debate about intentions, detente, and arms limitations, because its submarines carry a large part of the Soviet missile inventory, and because of the navy's involvement in trouble spots around the world. The West...

II: Naval Technology

read more

Technology and the Evolution of Naval Warfare

Karl Lautenschlager

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 173-221

A he perennial concern of military planners is that technological surprise will give an opponent a decisive advantage in event of war. Technological developments combined with tactical innovation can bring about fundamental change...

read more

Will Strategic Submarines Be Vulnerable?

Richard L. Garwin

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 222-237

In view of the increasing emphasis placed upon strategic submarines under the Reagan strategic program announced October 2, 1981, it is of interest to review the prospects for survivability of such submarines in the foreseeable future. This is particularly timely because the Scowcroft Commission...

read more

The Submarine in Naval Warfare, 1901-2001

Karl Lautenschlager

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 238-284

This article surveys the evolution of submarine technology, submarine capability, and strategy for the use of submarines. It traces change in the operational capabilities of submarines since their introduction, evaluates the past effectiveness of submarine forces in war, and suggests how...

read more

Stopping the Sea-Based Counterforce Threat

Harold A. Feiveson, John Duffield

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 285-300

The ballistic missile submarine has long been thought to have an important counterforce role in the execution of nuclear war. This is especially true of potential Soviet first strikes against the United States. Soviet submarine-launched ballistic missiles (SLBMs) fired close to U.S. shores and...

III: Naval Operations-Controlling the Risks

read more

Nuclear War at Sea

Desmond Ball

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 303-331

The subject of nuclear warfare at sea, and the difficulties of controlling escalation of conflict at sea, has so far drawn very little attention from the strategic community.1 This is despite the fact that more than a third of the nuclear weapons of the U.S. and the Soviet Union are deployed on sea-based...

read more

Inadvertent Nuclear War? Escalation and Nato's Northern Flank

Barry R. Posen

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 332-358

Could a major East-West conventional war be kept conventional? American policymakers increasingly seem to think so. Recent discussions of such a clash reflect the belief that protracted conventional conflict is possible, if only the West fields sufficient conventional forces and acquires...

read more

A Quiet Success for Arms Control: Preventing Incidents at Sea

Sean Μ. Lynn-Jones

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 359-389

The 1972 Agreement on the Prevention of Incidents at Sea between the United States and the Soviet Union1 is a virtually forgotten remnant of an era that produced dozens of U.S.-Soviet accords. Although it was almost ignored in both the American and Soviet announcements of the various agreements...