Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title page, Series page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-vi

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

...Except for the Introduction, all of the essays in this volume have been previously published. I wish to thank the following editors, journals, and publishers for gracious permission to reprint these essays...

Abbreviations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xiv

read more

Introduction: Poets and Goatherds, Forests and Consuls: Art, Imagination, and Realism in Ancient Pastoral Poetry

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 3-24

...far closer to its classical models than is, say, Shakespearean tragedy to Sophocles or the nineteenth-century novel to Apuleius or Heliodorus. In pastoral, perhaps more than in any other literary genre, the modern reader is impelled back to the ancient...

read more

1. "Since Daphnis Dies": The Meaning of Theocritus' First Idyll

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 25-46

...fate is of a piece with the remote and mythical atmosphere of the tale as a whole: the appearance of gods, the Nymphs in the background, the conversation with Aphrodite. At the same time water is an important unifying symbol throughout the poem. Inviting, refreshing, joyful at the beginning (1-8), the haunt of Nymphs...

read more

2. Death by Water: A Narrative Pattern in Theocritus (Idylls 1, 13, 22, 23)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 47-65

...close association with water. At the end of Idyll 1 Daphnis 'goes to the stream' and dies. In 13 Hylas is drawn into a Nymph-haunted pool. In 22 Amycus fights his ill-fated match with Polydeuces beside clear, flowing water. In the pseudo-Theocritean...

read more

3. Adonis and Aphrodite: Theocritus, Idyll 3, 48

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 66-72

...On the phrase emphasized above Gow comments, The noun is hardly less surprising than the preposition, for its associations are maternal rather than erotic...

read more

4. Simaetha and the Lynx (Theocritus, Idyll 2)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 73-84

...mythical personification, words and acts may have associations not immediately obvious to us because they form part of a pattern of thought which we no longer share. Especially in matters of ritual or magic the poet may exploit...

read more

5. Theocritean Criticism and the Interpretation of the Fourth Idyll

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 85-109

...whose conventional, but highly symbolic and allusive language embraces questions of man's relation to art and imagination, to passion and work, to the potential for order...

read more

6. Theocritus' Seventh Idyll and Lycidas

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 110-166

...Until recently the principal task of interpreters was the "unmasking" of Lycidas, Simichidas, and the other characters. But even those who devoted themselves to this problem...

read more

7. Simichidas' Modesty: Theocritus, Idyll 7.44

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 167-175

...particular phraseology, he suggests, is to be explained by the accompanying gift of the goatherd's crook: "It seems probable that Lycidas' choice of words is connected...

read more

8. Thematic Coherence in Theocritus' Bucolic Idylls

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 176-209

...The elements which compose the bucolic landscape and action of these poems are not to be regarded as parts of a static, decorative stage-setting of "little weight and...

read more

9. Landscape into Myth: Theocritus' Bucolic Poetry

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 210-234

...Thanks to greater sophistication about the nature of pastoral and a better knowledge of Hellenistic poetry we have probably left behind forever the notion of Theocritus as the conveyor of a 'plain image' of rustic life...

read more

10. Virgil's Caelatum Opus: An Interpretation of the Third Eclogue

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 235-264

...pastoral convention. His poems form a kind of dialogue not only with the pastoral tradition, but with the poetic tradition of the past as a whole...

read more

11. Pastoral Realism and the Golden Age: Correspondence and Contrast Between Virgil's Third and Fourth Eclogues

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 265-270

...In the light of Virgil's composition of the "Eclogue Book", arranged with selfconscious attention to the relations of the separate poems to one another2, the resemblances between the two scenes are more than fortuitous. Aries and vellera occur only in these two places...

read more

12. Tamen Cantabitis, Arcades: Exile and Arcadia in Eclogues 1 and 9

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 271-300

...definite relation to certain political circumstances, that relation is one of a poet and not an historian. It is the ability to transform personal experience into larger, more intensely significant terms wherein lies the distinguishing quality of the poet's genius. The poet's experience...

read more

13. Virgil's Sixth Eclogue and the Problem of Evil

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 301-329

...Grand themes are its concern: passion, violence, cosmic and poetic creation, the relation between man and nature. No one formulation of the many subtle and complex relationships between these...

read more

14. Two Fauns and a Naiad? (Virgil, ECL. 6, 13-26)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 330-335

...Chromis and Mnasyllus, otherwise unidentified, see the drunken Silenus asleep in his cave; with the help of a naiad, Aegle, they bind him with his own wreaths...

read more

15. Caves, Pan, and Silenus: Virgil's Sixth Eclogue and the Pastoral Epigrams of Theocritus

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 336-340

...which indicate that these poems, certainly as likely to be familiar to Virgil as Theopompus, may have suggested to Virgil some of the details of his setting...

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 341-348