Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

List of Illustrations

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pp. ix-x

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xiv

...looms large in later life, so is it also with our scholarly coming of age. There are many people to thank for their contribution to the foundations, and I have deep pleasure in thanking them, and...

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A Note on Usage

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pp. xv-xvi

...however, particularly when the discussion is of a philological nature, I have used the untransliterated Greek. My regular practice has been to use the Latinized version of Greek proper names, unless the Greek...

List of Editions and Abbreviations

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pp. xvii-xxiii

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1. Introduction

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pp. 3-12

...are gracious, and so, in the language of real estate, are their homes. The three Graces are familiar ancient divinities whose purpose and purview has remained puzzling; they are decorative, at the least...

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2. The Charis of Achilles

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pp. 13-40

...fighting (because the Greeks were taking heavy losses in the war without their best fighter), sent an embassy to offer Achilles the restoration of his concubine Briseis and added to this a massive indemnity of gifts...

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3. The Charites

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pp. 41-55

...invocation and enumeration of the gifts of the Charites, the song resembles a cult hymn more than it does an epinician ode; Pindar's words reflect a familiarity with the fundamental religious and social dimensions...

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4. Erotic Charis

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pp. 56-72

...frequently described like Pandora— garlanded, or picking flowers. Athenaeus preserves some words of Clearchus of Soli on this subject, taken from his Amatoria. People, he says, have a fondness for carrying fruits and flowers because of their attraction...

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5. Social Charis

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pp. 73-86

...This is a secular combination of charis and aidos·, they are not associated with mortals' entering the divine presence (Demeter) or experiencing the paralyzing power of love (Pandora). In the case of Demeter or Pandora, we are witnessing human encounters that...

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6. Epinician Charis

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pp. 87-123

...is obliterated by death. This same claim was made on behalf of poetry by Theognis, Sappho, and Ibycus, as well as by Pindar and Bacchylides. Poets were the first to recognize the fact that the ultimate achievement of poetic charis was rescuing a mortal...

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7. The Charis of the Oresteia

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pp. 124-146

...which had held two individuals in a tightly bound nexus of reciprocal favoring, was on the way to standing for the political favors that bought one's way in the Hellenistic city. Like the other cardinal...

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8. Conclusion

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pp. 147-150

...moral system of the Greeks of the archaic and early classical age: It was the moral glue of their society, linking such other central moral ideas as time, dike, themis, xenia, and aidds. This is a striking...

Appendix 1 Euripidean Charis

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pp. 151-160

Appendix 2 The Prepositional Use of χάϱιν

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pp. 161-164

Glossary

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pp. 165-166

Bibliography

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pp. 167-180

Index Locorum Antiquorum

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pp. 181-186

General Index

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pp. 187-192