Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-viii

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Editors' Preface

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pp. ix-x

When Princeton University began archaeological research at Morgantina in 1955, the primary objective was study of the then nameless Hellenistic city on the Serra Orlando ridge. Casual discoveries on the adjacent Cittadella hill had previously indicated the existence of another, possibly earlier, settlement on that site, and in 1957 the Princeton expedition opened exploratory trenches on the Cittadella. ...

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Preface

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pp. xi-xii

This report could not have been written without the support of a number of institutions and individuals. First and foremost I wish to thank the Leverhulme Trust (London) for a study abroad grant from 1985-1987, which enabled me to undertake the research. ...

Abbreviations

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pp. xiii-xvi

List of Text Figures

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pp. xvii-xviii

List of Plates

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pp. xix-xxii

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Introduction

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pp. 3-10

The remains of the protohistoric settlement on the Cittadella were excavated over a period of fourteen years, between 1957 and 1970, initially under the direction of Richard Stillwell and Erik Sjoqvist, and subsequently of Hubert L. Allen. Although the contributions of many individuals who were associated with the expedition over the years have been mentioned in the preliminary reports and in the first volume of this series, ...

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I. The Excavations

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pp. 11-48

The excavations in 1967 and 1968 on the summit of the Cittadella hill (Farmhouse Hill) brought to light evidence for occupation during the Iron Age, Archaic, and later periods. Trench 2 was located close to the summit of the hill, at about 568 meters a.s.l., in the most prominent location of Area III (Figs. 2-5; Pis. 4 and 6:b).1 ...

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II. The Finds

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pp. 49-96

Various kinds of pottery are represented in the protohistoric and later layers at the site. Apart from differences in the shape of vessels, the following wares can be distinguished on the basis of general stylistic and technical criteria: handmade coarse ware, plumed ware, painted geometric ware of local type, wheelmade painted geometric ware of the finer Siculan geometric class, wheel-made plain ware, and incised ware. ...

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III. The Iron Age Tombs

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pp. 97-110

The rock-cut chamber tombs of the Cittadella hill in Area III were mostly located on the steep slopes around the 500 meter contour where a number of burial areas were identified (Necropoleis II, IV, and V) with depositions dated mainly to the Archaic period.1 Necropolis IV lay on the northwest slope of the Cittadella hill, between about the 450 and 490 meter contours, ...

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IV. Chronology

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pp. 111-126

The material assemblage from most of the protohistoric habitation contexts at the site, where pottery predominates over metal artifacts, does not provide particularly sensitive indicators upon which to base a refined chronological sequence. Given the scarcity of diagnostic bronze types, such as fibulae, the establishment of absolute dates for some habitation layers is problematic. ...

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V. The Protohistoric Period

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pp. 127-162

Morgantina is situated close to the center of Sicily, about 54 kms. inland from the east coast and about 48 kms. from the south coast near Gela (Figs. 1, 35-37). The site lies in the foothills on the eastern edge of the higher plateau country of central Sicily, south of the Simeto, Dittaino, and Gornalunga rivers, which flow eastward over the Catania plain to the Ionian Sea. ...

VI. Catalogue of the Finds

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pp. 163-224

Table of Relative Proportions of Weighed Pottery

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pp. 225-228

Concordance of Inventory and Catalogue Numbers

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pp. 229-234

Index

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pp. 235-240

Plates

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pp. 241-406