Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-viii

List of Tables

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pp. ix-x

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Preface

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pp. xi-xiv

Studies of the life and works of Galileo Galilei have flourished throughout the twentieth century because of the splendid National Edition of his writings, edited by Antonio Favaro, whose twenty-one volumes were brought to completion in 1909. ...

Part One: Textual Analysis

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1. Sources of Galileo's Logical Questions

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pp. 3-53

Much is already known about the life of Galileo Galilei, particularly his discoveries and the polemics surrounding the publication of his principal works on astronomy and the science of mechanics. Considerably less is known about his early period, that from his birth at Pisa in 1564 to his perfection of the telescope at Padua in 1609, ...

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2. Sources of Galileo's Physical Questions

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pp. 54-96

Previous studies of the materials in Galileo's MS 46, with its questions on the universe and the elements—called the physical questions mainly to distinguish them from the logical questions of MS 27—show that these are based on, and probably were extracted from, writings of Jesuit professors at the Collegio Romano.1 ...

Part Two: Science at the Collegio Romano

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3. Sciences and Demonstrative Methods

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pp. 99-148

The notion of science that was current when Galileo began his teaching career at the University of Pisa is different from that of the present day. While sharing in some characteristics, such as the publicly verifiable aspect of the knowledge it produced, the science of his day made more stringent claims to certitude and infallibility than does that of the modern era. ...

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4. The Study of Local Motion

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pp. 149-216

Most attempts that have been made to fill out the background of Galileo's study of local motion have focused on the writings of philosophers in the universities of northern Italy or on those of applied mathematicians in the Archimedean tradition working largely outside the universities. ...

Part Three: Galileo's Science in Transition

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5. Galileo's Earlier Science (Before 1610)

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pp. 219-280

The materials surveyed in the preceding two chapters are very extensive, and it is no simple matter to relate them to Galileo's logical and physical questions and to his other writings in his early and late years. Part of the difficulty stems from the sheer number and extent of Galileo's compositions, ...

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6. Galileo's Later Science (After 1610)

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pp. 281-350

As 1609 drew to a close Galileo was already past mid-life and could look back on a series of respectable accomplishments: his competence as a mathematician was recognized, he was valued as a teacher, and he had had considerable success as an instrument maker. ...

Bibliography

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pp. 351-362

Index

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pp. 363-371