Cover

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Title Page, Series Page, Copyright Page, Dedication

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Contents

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Maps

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Chronology

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pp. xi-xiv

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Chapter 1. Whose Rights and Whose Peace?

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pp. 1-36

“We have peace,” declared “Séamus,” a taxi driver in national west Belfast. “And they can have their culture, or whatever they want to call it, as long as it’s not in my face. And I can have mine, and I hope I’m not in their face.”1 Séamus was explaining to me his attitude toward loyalists and the new, separate...

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Chapter 2. The Usual Suspects

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pp. 37-68

At the bottom of the Falls Road, in the Divis area of west Belfast, one wall has become a dedicated site for murals. It is called the “international wall,” and the murals there draw connections between Northern Ireland and other countries. Periodically, the murals are changed; exemplary paintings have...

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Chapter 3. Peace Sells—Who’s Buying?

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pp. 69-100

During my fieldwork in west Belfast, research participants frequently described triumphs over state agencies, especially welfare bureaucracies. “Sarah,” a community activist from the Shankill, recounted a particularly funny story about “doing the double” (working in the informal economy...

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Chapter 4. The Politics We Deserve

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pp. 101-132

“Do you think we get the politics we deserve?” a lawyer asked me over coffee on a gray morning in August 2011. She leaned back and answered her question before I could reply: “I do. It’s nonsense to say that political representatives here don’t speak for people—they do it well enough to keep getting...

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Chapter 5. No Justice, No Peace

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pp. 133-167

“At least I wasn’t a traitor!” bellowed a Democratic Unionist Party councillor in the September 1997 Belfast City Council meeting. He was enraged that Progressive Unionist Party councillors David Ervine and Billy Hutchinson did not vote to commemorate the Bloody Friday bombings of 1972. As if they...

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Chapter 6. “Love Is a Human Right”

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pp. 168-200

“Over the years, the way she has treated my community, I have opposed her at every turn. I can’t tell you the number of waiters I’ve told to spit in her food.” “Daniel,” a young civil servant from a nationalist background, was relaxing with a pint as we enjoyed late evening sunshine in May 2010. Like...

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Chapter 7. Ethnopolitics and Human Rights

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pp. 201-216

In the twenty-first century, Northern Ireland’s inclusive peace process was attenuated; many negotiations about the Good Friday Agreement’s (GFA) implementation took place between the British government and one or two political parties. Senior British advisers such as Jonathan Powell (2008) frame...

Notes

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pp. 217-230

Glossary

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pp. 231-244

Bibliography

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pp. 245-272

Index

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pp. 273-284

Acknowledgments

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p. 285