Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Quote

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pp. i-v

Contents

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pp. vi-viii

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1. Introduction

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pp. 3-10

...DP, his viola player thought otherwise; the only way to resolve the dilemma was to write to the composer himself. This was not the only notational problem that they faced; in fact quite a few such letters were written. Unfortunately, only one reply survives—or, rather, a draft of one— but it provides a rare insight...

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2. Motifs, Counterpoint, and Form

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pp. 11-53

...quartet, Op. 135, is more a cryptic epigraph than a motivic manifesto. Nevertheless, analysts—including Schoenberg, Reti, Epstein, and Cooke—have embraced it as their mandate, echoing "It must be! It must be!" to their notions of motivic analysis...

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3. Unity and Disunity

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pp. 54-106

...concrete manifestation of the Sublime, drawing us "into the spirit world of the infinite." The ineffably exalted and the tangibly rational were coupled together. By the late quartets, however, the power of the Sublime was no longer a matter of inexorable logic but of utter madness. At least, this was the opinion...

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4. Rhythm, Time, and Space

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pp. 107-162

...crushing the subject into cowering admiration. This dialectic, according to Burke, manifests itself in the kind of music—not unlike the A minor Quartet—in which constant contrast and transition spawns complexity and variety...

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5. Cadences and Closure

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pp. 163-200

...was probably not until the end of August that the concept of this quartet had crystallized sufficiently for Beethoven to predict, somewhat optimistically, to both his nephew and Karl HoIz that the quartet would be finished in a matter...

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6. Doubles and Parallels

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pp. 201-244

...elusive or suddenly peculiar. In such movements, analysis has to cut through the polished exteriors, forcing open the tiniest cracks to reveal the disorder within; it is a type of 'micro-analysis' that focusses on missing crotchets, hairline...

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7. Conclusion

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pp. 245-248

...entire form and even a whole work. In this way the elements of musical construction are redefined and controlled by a logic that often contradicts the functions and patterns of Classical forms. It is precisely this alterior logic which creates a critical disturbance, pushing the dynamic of Classical composition and its motivic unity to such extremes that the structures become incomprehensible...

Notes

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pp. 249-272

Bibliography

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pp. 273-282

Index

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pp. 283-286