Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-iv

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. v-viii

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xiv

...more than a century ago. Because of the vast scope and complexity of the process, the authors decided to focus primarily on institutions established or utilized in major large-scale modern industries that have been leading...

read more

I. Human Resources in Modern Economic Development

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 3-21

...country began its transformation from a traditional agrarian society in the mid-nineteenth century to an advanced industrialized nation during the first half of the twentieth century. It fills a gap in the knowledge about the process by which an economically less developed country...

read more

II. Formal Education in the Development of Japan's Modern Economy

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 22-59

...relationship between a nation's modern economic growth and its formal education system is not precisely understood, there is little question that they go hand in hand and that one paves the way for the other...

read more

III. Educational Indicators of Japan's Human Resource Development

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 60-91

...economic growth helps to delineate strategic choices that the Japanese made with somewhat greater precision than would a description of the development of Japan's educational system. In addition, quantification helps in making comparisons with the experiences...

read more

IV. Industrial Training in Japan: An Overview

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 92-135

...Restoration for their strategy to take shape. Initially there was a build-up of a highly structured system of formal education including a variety of specific vocational tracks. However, after considerable experimentation in the schools and ministries, the problem of generating...

read more

V. Training in Basic Industries: Steel and Shipbuilding in the Prewar Period

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 136-175

...Although Japan s modern economic growth followed the familiar path of first emphasizing light industry, particularly textiles, conscious attempts to establish a heavy industry base began even prior to the Meiji Restoration.1 It was clear to the Tokugawa leadership that...

read more

VI. Training within Government-Owned Industries: Railways and Telecommunications

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 176-205

...ownership, by the 1880s the Meiji government had sold most of them to private individuals and companies. There were notable exceptions, however, to this divestiture process. Various factories, shipyards, mines...

read more

VII. Training Patterns in Traditional Private Industries: Banking, Textiles,and Mining

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 206-257

...contrasted with the intensive within enterprise training of the new technologically advanced industries treated in the preceding two chapters. Such private companies, despite initial government operation in some cases, depended far less on internal programs...

read more

VIII. Training in Capital-intensive Industries: Heavy Machinery, Electrical Equipment, and Chemicals

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 258-282

...privately owned, technologically advanced enterprises in heavy machinery, electrical equipment, and chemicals production. Although these industries trace their origins to the late nineteenth century, major growth did not take place until the 1930s; along with steel and shipbuilding...

read more

IX. Human Resources in Japanese Industry: Problems and Prospects

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 283-311

...advanced sectors of the Japanese economy, one may conclude that Japan's experience in generating and employing human resources for modern industries has been varied and diffuse. No single pattern emerges. Certainly, however, except for the government's initial launching...

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 312-320

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 321-333