Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xx

Τ. S. Eliot advises in his long essay on Dante (1929) that readers "for several reasons" approach the Vita Nuova only after the Commedia. Otherwise, he contends, the work will yield "nothing but Pre-Raphaelite quaintness." "It is not," he adds, "for Dante, a masterpiece." ...

read more

1. The Vita Nuova and the "New" Poet

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 3-26

In the Supplement to Part III of the Summa Theologica, Thomas Aquinas takes up the question of whether "after the resurrection everyone will not be able to know all the sins he has committed" (Q87). The problem is reconciling the image of a "book of conscience" wherein sins would bear witness to the moral character of the individual (Romans 2:15) ...

read more

2. The Vita Nuova and the Literature of Self

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 27-50

The opening tractate of Dante's Convivio gives two "specially conspicuous" reasons for an individual's being allowed to speak of himself: "when, without discoursing about oneself, great disgrace and danger cannot be avoided" and "when, from speaking about oneself, great advantage to others follows in the way of teaching" (I.ii.95-101). ...

read more

3. The Architecture of the Vita Nuova

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 51-70

Despite Michele Barbi's assertion that the divisions of the Vita Nuova are to show that Dante "is not one of those 'coarse' versifiers who botch up poems," readers have been bothered by their presence in the book. The divisions were deleted from the editio princeps (1576) and, in the nineteenth century, ...

read more

4. The Prose of the Vita Nuova

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 71-94

The overwhelming response to the Vita Nuova is to the love story—both as an example of certain attitudes toward love and as an account of a young man's feelings for a woman. Yet, despite the various claims that Dante makes in these areas, readers are not able to agree as to what exactly his attitudes are or the necessity for a real woman to support his reformation. ...

read more

5. The "Dante" of the Vita Nuova

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 95-116

The figure of Dante that emerges from the Vita Nuova is by the poet's own admission partial in that it is limited to those poems and events that "relate to the theme of the most gracious lady Beatrice" (V). Yet readers are not aware of the extent of the partiality until they begin to see the Dante of the Vita Nuova against other of his youthful poems and activities ...

read more

6. The Vita Nuova and Subsequent Poetic Autobiography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 117-138

Readers of the Vita Nuova are immediately struck by the presence of Beatrice. She appears first in Chapter II, already "in glory," as having been the source of the poet's sexual and moral awakening, and by the end of Chapter V, readers are informed that they will receive no material unless it relates "to the theme of that most gracious lady." ...

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 139-146

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 147-150