In this Book

The Murder of Joe White
summary
In 1894 Wisconsin game wardens Horace Martin and Josiah Hicks were dispatched to arrest Joe White, an Ojibwe ogimaa (chief), for hunting deer out of season and off-reservation. Martin and Hicks found White and made an effort to arrest him. When White showed reluctance to go with the wardens, they started beating him; he attempted to flee, and the wardens shot him in the back, fatally wounding him. Both Martin and Hicks were charged with manslaughter in local county court, and they were tried by an all-white jury. A gripping historical study, The Murder of Joe White contextualizes this event within decades of struggle of White’s community at Rice Lake to resist removal to the Lac Courte Oreilles Reservation, created in 1854 at the Treaty of La Pointe. While many studies portray American colonialism as defined by federal policy, The Murder of Joe White seeks a much broader understanding of colonialism, including the complex role of state and local governments as well as corporations. All of these facets of American colonialism shaped the events that led to the death of Joe White and the struggle of the Ojibwe to resist removal to the reservation.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title page, Series page, Copyright, Dedication
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  1. Contents
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. ix-xii
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. xiii-xxvi
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  1. Pronunciation Guide
  2. pp. xxvii-xxviii
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  1. Chapter 1. The Rise of Nena’aangabi and American Expansion in the Western Great Lakes, 1825– 1837
  2. pp. 1-30
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  1. Chapter 2. Nena’aangabi and the Language of Treaties, 1837– 1855
  2. pp. 31-64
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  1. Chapter 3. Waabizheshi’s Vision of an Intercultural Community at Rice Lake, 1855– 1877
  2. pp. 65-100
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  1. Chapter 4. Aazhaweyaa and Ojibwe Women in Transition
  2. pp. 101-124
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  1. Chapter 5. Giishkitawag Confronts Removal, 1879– 1894
  2. pp. 125-148
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  1. Chapter 6. The Murder of Joe White and the Culmination of Removal
  2. pp. 149-178
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  1. Chapter 7. Maggie Quaderer, Steve Grover, and the Creation of Community at Whitefish, 1894– 1920
  2. pp. 179-204
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  1. Conclusion
  2. pp. 205-210
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 211-268
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  1. Select Bibliography
  2. pp. 269-278
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 279-282
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