Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. vii

List of Tables

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

Statistical Appendix

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xii

read more

Preface and Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xiii-xiv

This book is the work of a skeptic trying to use training in the fields of political science and economics to carry out a study of the political economy of foreign investment. I have found that in fact there are tools in both of these disciplines to do a respectable job. If I had recognized this sooner, and got on with the job, as some of my friends ably suggested, I would have made...

read more

1 Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 3-15

I η 1912, looking back over the history of nitrates and forward toward the future of copper, the celebrated Chilean writer and historian Francisco Encina regarded with despair the process which he called the "denationalization" of those industries that exploited the country's basic natural resources.1 He was distressed by the spectacle of the nation's vital industries...

read more

2 Structure and Strategy in the International Copper Industry

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 16-56

I h e s u c c e s s of any o l i g o p o l i s t i c i n d u s t r y — w h e t h e r g e n erating private corporate profits, or generating funds for public welfare and national development—comes from exacting an economic rent from final consumers. Such rent is a higher-than-"normal" return that results from the restriction of competition.1 And the restriction of competition, in turn, is a function of three factors: barriers to the entry of newcomers into...

read more

3 The Multinational Copper Companies in Chile and the Growth of Economic Nationalism, 1945-1954:Declining Terms of Trade and the Early Elaboration of a Framework for Dependencia

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 57-88

A satisfactory analysis of the development of economic nationalism in Chile, of the growth of the idea of dependencia, would require an essay in intellectual history. As the usage of the term dependencia grew in popularity after the Second World War, as diverse Chilean groups found the concept useful or accurate or convenient in describing their country's relations with...

read more

4 "Good Investment Climate" and the Nuevo Trato Mining Legislation of 1955: Death and Rebirth of the Idea of Dependencia

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 89-118

1 he first round in the postwar growth of economic nationalism in Chile began with tensions aroused by the desire for industrialization after the Second World War and ended with the Chilean sales monopoly of 1952. During this period the course of the relations between the country and the multinational copper companies gave rise to a feeling of dependencia, a sense...

read more

5 From Chileanization to Nationalization: Success andRevenge in the Movement away from Dependencia

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 119-152

1 he growth of economic nationalism in Chile began with frustration at the feelings of dependencia after the Second World War and reached an initial peak with the sales monopoly of 1952—as a first unsuccessful attempt to end that dependencia. A second phase in the growth of economic nationalism began with the failure of the sales monopoly and ended with the rejection of...

read more

6 A Model of the Relations Between the Host Country and Foreign Investors: Balance of Power, National Interest, and Economic Nationalism

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 153-224

For twenty-five years after the end of the Second World War Chile mounted a drive, never long abated, to close in on and ultimately to take over the large foreign copper companies whose operations played such a central role in the development of the national economy. When President Eduardo Frei began the nationalization of Anaconda, he exclaimed: "This is the...

read more

7 Chile and the Future of Dependencia

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 225-246

Chapter 2 traced the evolution of strategy in the international copper industry as a series of efforts to preserve and protect the ability of producers to exact an economic rent from final industrial consumers. Chapters 3 through 6 outlined the conflict between Chile's drive for sovereign control over a dynamic national development and the private decision-making processes...

read more

8 Economic Nationalism and the Future

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 247-260

A national interest in building the economy, providing for the welfare of the society, and controlling national sovereignty propelled successive Chilean administrations and their opponents to push against the foreign copper companies. Despite ebbs and flows of confidence as elites from across the domestic spectrum tested their strengths and abilities against the uncertainties....

Statistical Appendix

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 261-270

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 271-280

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 281-289