Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

CONTENTS

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pp. v-vi

LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS

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pp. vii-viii

MAPS

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EDITOR'S INTRODUCTION

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pp. ix-xviii

...works of Vasilii Vladimirovich Bartol'd (1869-1930), or Wilhelm Barthold, as his name was orginally rendered in the Germano- Russian milieu into which he was born...

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INTRODUCTION

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pp. 3-5

...seas, and on the west, south, and southeast, the basin of the Indian ocean. The country is one of the so-called interior, landlocked basins, whose characteristic peculiarities have been best described by F. Richthofen...

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I Bactria, Balkh, and Tukharistan

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pp. 6-34

...framework of the Achaemenid empire founded by the Persians, the customs and habits of the Bactrians and Soghdians were sharply distinct from those of the inhabitants of the western half of the kingdom; according to Strabo...

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II Marw and the Course of the Murghab

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pp. 35-46

...between the two largest cities of Arab Khurasan, Marw and Balkh, left Marw first in a southerly direction along the Murghab toward the mountains, then...

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III Harat and the Course of the Η an Rud

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pp. 47-63

...The country between Harat and Marw al-Rud was called Ganj Rustaq, and that between Harat and Sarakhs, Badghis; this latter term later acquired a wider meaning and came to designate the whole northwestern...

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IV Sistan, the Southern Part of Afghanistan and Baluchistan

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pp. 64-86

...worshiper built a bridge across the Harl Rud which, according to Maqdisi, had no equal in all of Khurasan. In Timurid times, Isfizari mentions the bridge by its present name, Pul-i Malan; in English books, it...

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V Khurasan

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pp. 87-111

...along the northern route, that of the Medes, or whether it also followed the southern route from Sistan to Kirman and from there to Fars. The latter seems more likely, considering the fact that the Persians who asserted...

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VI Qumis and Gurgan

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pp. 112-120

...the foothills and occasionally through them. These gradually diminishing ridges offered a suitable corridor for Turkmen raids, which ceased only with the conquest of Etek by the Russians. Until that time, it was considered...

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VII Ray and Hamadan

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pp. 121-132

...Travelers describe the guard towers and walls that until recently served as protection from incursions by the Turkomans; one can see from Ibn Rusta's account that such towers were there as early as the beginning of the...

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VIII Quhistan, Kirman, and Makran

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pp. 133-147

...individual mountain chains, through the plateau itself. In historical times, the important road led from Sistan to Bam. The cultivated belt is separated here from Sistan by an extensive steppe area, but one less extensive...

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IX Fars

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pp. 148-168

...but also the dynasty that in the third century A.D. restored the might of Persian nationhood and religion and that successfully put an end to...

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Χ Isfahan, Kashan, and Qum

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pp. 169-179

...route through the town of Mayin was considered the main road. This road joined, it would seem, the present-day one near the town of Yazdikhwast, situated on a cliff in the middle of a valley; this town, despite...

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XI Luristan and Khuzistan

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pp. 180-194

...Arab geographers mention two roads from Hamadan to Isfahan, both of which passed through the town of Burujird and which bifurcated ten farsakhs...

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XII Kurdistan and Mesopotamia

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pp. 195-206

...always had great importance. In Arab times, it was part of the principal trade route from western to eastern Asia, because of which it is described by the Arab geographers in especially great detail; the most detailed...

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XIII The Mountains North of Hamadan

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pp. 207-213

...now, by Kurds; the region between Kirmanshahan and Azerbaijan bears today the name of Ardalan; its chief city is Sinna, or, more exactly, Senna [Modern Sanandaj]. In the nineteenth century, the Kurdish...

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XIVAzerbaijan and Armenia

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pp. 214-229

...there. Atropates succeeded in establishing a modest kingdom that received his name (Atropatene in Greek, Atrpatakan in Armenian, whence Azerbaijan); this small state is noteworthy as the first manifestation of...

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XV Gilan and Mazandaran

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pp. 230-242

...Mazandaran, which occupy the narrow belt between the mountains and the sea, suffer not from lack, but from excess of moisture. A multitude of rivers flow from the mountains; most form at their estuaries the so-called...

BIBLIOGRAPHY

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pp. 243-266

INDEX

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pp. 267-286