Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Acknowledgement

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pp. vii-viii

The field research on which this book is based was carried out as a Scholar of The Australian National University under the supervision of the late Professor S. F. Nadel. For permission to use materials which have already been published I have to thank the Editors of Oceania, Man, ...

Contents

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pp. ix-x

Illustrations

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pp. xi-xii

Author's Note

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pp. xiii-xiv

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Preface to the 1995 Edition

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pp. xv-xviii

The phone call from Princeton came as a surprise: "May we have your permission to consider Mambu for our mythology reprint series?" First published by Methuen in 1960, republished as a Harper Torchbook in 1970, here it is again, neither edited nor rewritten, a response to varieties of demand. ...

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Preface

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pp. xix-xxviii

Mambu is the name of a native of New Guinea, a Kanaka who in the late 'thirties of this century led what has come to be known as a 'Cargo' movement. Most of his activities took place in the Bogia region of the Madang District in the Australian Trust Territory of New Guinea. ...

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Prologue

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pp. 1-13

When in the field anthropologists frequently have experiences which they tend to reserve for dinner parties or as a relaxation after seminars. Only rarely do such anecdotes find their way into serious discourse. And in many ways it is a shame that this should be so. ...

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I. The New Guinea Scene

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pp. 14-44

Because men of European descent are involved in Cargo movements, events such as those which have been described in the Prologue belong to a complex far greater than might be implied simply by 'Tangu' or 'Manam island'. ...

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II. The People [i]

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pp. 45-71

To appreciate the Kanaka point of view, and to be aware of the kind of responsibility that is put on the shoulders of administrative officers and missionaries—who must, if they are to initiate changes and a new way of life, first select what they consider to be wrong or mistaken, ...

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III. The People [ii]

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pp. 72-111

Tangu economic life, gardening, hunting, gathering, and the manufacture of such articles as string bags and clay pots, is largely—but not wholly—a matter of their own internal adaptations and traditional arrangements. ...

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IV. The People [iii]

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pp. 112-146

Behind Tangu as we find them today lie many years of continuous change and development. Before the grandparents of the present generation had seen a white man, and possibly before they had heard there were such people, a series of far-reaching changes were already in train. ...

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V. The Myth-dream [i]

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pp. 147-176

For a period of some seventy years leading up to the events narrated in the Prologue, then, Tangu were a developing political entity who suffered a series of crises traceable both to internal and external sources. Conflicts concerning the rules of descent and who were marriageable mates; ...

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VI. The Myth-dream [ii]

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pp. 177-207

What has been called the Primal Myth appears to contain the first, and perhaps basic, expressions of the Cargo myth-dream. From the time when these feelings first gained consent and became lodged in a myth, until 1951 when Tangu participated in Cargo cult activities, ...

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VII. The Myth-dream [iii]

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pp. 208-245

By the time Mambu started his movement Tangu and the peoples living between them and the coast had become familiar with things European. They saw administrative officers from time to time and, more often, the less formal missionary. ...

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VIII. Cargo

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pp. 246-284

To answer the question 'Why do Cargo cults occur?' would entail raising profound metaphysical issues beyond the scope of this book. Hysteria, dream visions, tensions, release of tensions, rites, ceremonies, time, and place are all too easily explained away. ...

Appendix A

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pp. 285-288

Appendix B

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pp. 289-290

Index

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pp. 291-299