Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page, Dedication

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Contents

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

My fieldwork in Chamelco was generously supported by National Science Foundation Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Grant #0613168, a Florida State University Dissertation Research Grant, and a Florida State University Department of Anthropology Eisele Predissertation Grant. I bear...

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Chapter 1. Gender, Kin, and Markets in the Land of Peace

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pp. 1-17

Each morning, as the sun rises over the mountains of San Juan Chamelco, Guatemala, the Q’eqchi’-Maya market women prepare for the busy day ahead. Waking long before daybreak, they complete their daily chores quietly in their homes as the smoke from the day’s first fire wafts from their stoves. After washing...

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Chapter 2. Continuity and Memory in San Juan Chamelco

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pp. 18-40

A few weeks after my arrival in Chamelco, Doña Rogelia,1 my first friend in town, encouraged me to buy and use Q’eqchi’ women’s indigenous dress (traje típico) consisting of a loose woven blouse (güipil) and skirt (corte), made from heavy woven fabric. In Guatemala, each distinct linguistic and ethnic community...

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Chapter 3. Markets and Marketers

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pp. 41-64

In 2004, Chamelco’s established merchants complained about a new market that had formed in the street in the town center. Changes in municipal policy had sanctioned it, designating three days a week as “Market Day” (Día de Plaza). Rural women from throughout the region received the right to sell...

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Chapter 4. Recognition and Immortality in the Market and Beyond

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pp. 65-97

In late 2006, Chamelco’s vendors campaigned for better working conditions in the interior marketplace. The municipal government had shut off the market’s electricity, meaning that the women had to close up their stalls each night in the darkness of the early evening hours. The running water that had flowed freely in...

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Chapter 5. All in the Junkab'al

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pp. 98-119

In 2004, I established myself in Chamelco by assisting market women with their daily responsibilities.1 I learned how to weigh and package grains, helped to organize their merchandise, and assisted on shopping trips to nearby Cobán and Carchá to purchase inventory. Learning the art of selling, I helped them...

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Chapter 6. Marketing Memory

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pp. 120-126

In the December 2005 battle over the annual Christmas market, Chamelco’s women defeated the town’s mayor by deploying their prestige to impose their desired location for the holiday marketplace. The prestige that vendors garner, which gives them political influence and enhances their families’ reputations...

Notes

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pp. 127-130

Glossary

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pp. 131-134

References

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pp. 135-152

Index

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pp. 153-160

About the Author, Series Page, Publisher Notes

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