Cover

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p. Cover

Title Page, About the Series, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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p. v

List of Figures and Tables

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pp. vii-viii

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Preface and Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xi

“DOES CONQUEST PAY?” is a controversial but little-studied question in international politics. That conquerors can harness captured economies is a longstanding premise of realist balance-of-power strategy and theory. But the virulence of nationalism, the correlation between development...

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1. Does Conquest Pay?

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pp. 3-17

DOES CONQUEST PAY in the modern era? Can invading powers mobilize the economic resources of occupied industrial societies? Or do nationalistic societies frustrate invaders by imposing high costs and denying economic gains? What factors influence the size of imperial profit margins...

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2. When Does Conquest Pay?

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pp. 18-35

UNDERSTANDING WHY and under what conditions conquest pays requires a theory about the sources of resistance and collaboration. This is because the behavior of conquered peoples greatly influences the revenues and collection costs of empire. Resistance—whether by whole nations, administrative agencies, political parties, unions, and businesses, or by...

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3. Nazi-Occupied Western Europe, 1940–1944

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pp. 36-68

IN THE SPACE of three short years, from 1938 through 1941, Hitler conquered nearly all of Europe. The course of this expansion began with the annexation of Austria in March 1938 and of the Czech Sudetenland after Munich. Hitler invaded the Czech rump of Bohemia-Moravia in March...

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4. Belgium and Luxembourg, 1914–1918

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pp. 69-86

BY THE TIME Germany’s 1914 offensive against France stalled at the battle of the Marne, the German Army had occupied Belgium, northern France, and Luxembourg. Over the next four years, Germany attempted to mobilize these relatively industrialized regions for its draining struggle...

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5. The Ruhr-Rhineland, 1923–1924

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pp. 87-98

REPARATION, like imperial tribute, consists of economic resources extorted from vanquished nations. The main difference is that reparations are justified by victors, fairly or unfairly, as legitimate and finite compensation for war damages and costs caused by criminal aggression. But few defeated nations are so burdened by war guilt that they happily surrender...

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6. The Japanese Empire, 1910–1945

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pp. 99-119

THE JAPANESE EMPIRE differs from previously analyzed episodes of conquest in both duration and level of development. Japan built it up over a half century by conquering and then developing backward, agrarian societies. When first seized—Taiwan in 1895, Korea in 1905, and Manchuria...

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7. The Soviet Empire, 1945–1989

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pp. 120-145

BY THE TIME the smoke cleared at the end of the Second World War, Stalin’s Red Army had nearly restored Soviet borders to czarist dimensions and had occupied Eastern Europe as well. Installing loyal communist regimes and backing them with threats of force, the Soviet Union...

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8. The Spoils of Conquest

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pp. 146-157

THIS BOOK began by identifying the implications of the cumulativity of industrial resources for international politics. A lack of systematic research on this subject has resulted in longstanding theoretical and foreign-policy debates that can be traced to contrary assumptions about...

Notes

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pp. 159-208

Works Cited

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pp. 209-242

Index

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pp. 243-250