Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, About the Series, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. v-viii

read more

Foreword

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xxx

"There are few people in the world who have more opportunity for getting close to the hot interesting things of one's time than the special correspondent of a great paper," George Lynch, a veteran British correspondent, wrote in Impressions of a War Correspondent, published in 1903.1 ...

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xxxi-xxxii

While many war correspondents were waiting in Tokio to go to the front with the Japanese army, the idea was suggested and readily taken up, that each should write a short story of one of his most interesting experiences. ...

read more

"A Naval Engagement"

E. Ashmead Bartlett

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-4

In former days one-of the most Fascinating features of, and also one of the greatest incentives to warfare, was the prospect of loot it held out to the contending armies. Now all that is changed ; the soldier, his officer, and his general are paid an equivalent in money, for what a grateful government considers he would formerly have made by looting from the enemy. ...

read more

"President McKinley's Assassination" and "From Our Special at the Front"

Richard Barry

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 5-10

During the afternoon of September 8, 1991 I stood, with five fellow reporters, on a raised platform under a stained glass window in the Temple of Music at the Pan-American exposition in Buffalo, New York. In front of us the chairs had been angled to form an aisle from one door to the other and at the apex of the aisle stood William McKinley, receiving. ...

read more

"Under the Fire of an International Fleet"

John F. Bass

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 11-16

Fifty men of war, the watch dogs of the European Powers, dragged at their chains with the ebb and flow of the tide in Suda Bay. In full view, less than three miles distant, the Turkish block-house Malaxa stood on the edge of an arid plateau, outlined against the sheer, dazzling walls of the White Mountains of Crete. ...

read more

"A Night at Death's Door"

Will H. Brill

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 17-20

When a man really makes up his mind that he will be dead within a few hours, living becomes a matter of very little importance. It is a fact that there is a strange calmness and lack of anxiety as a result of this condition of mind. ...

read more

"A Battle with the Waves"

A. F. Cahusac

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 21-24

As my experiences have not yet extended to the battlefield, this being my first war, I must perforce write of other than warlike matters, and have chosen for my narrative a battle for life in the surf on the coast of the Southern Pacific. ...

read more

"Michaels, of Michaelmas Bay"

Franklin Clarkin

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 25-30

We had been a month or so "on the job," as the saying was, (meaning the Spanish war), steaming from one West Indian port to another—the port depending upon how rival despatch boats were heading with the issue of the day's operations. We had to lay our course for the place where we could be sure of a clear wire to New York. ...

read more

"Fifteen Hours Under Fire"

Will Levington Comfort

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 31-34

General Schwan with an expeditionary brigade was scorching his way down through the southern provinces of Luzon, encountering no pronounced shocks of battle, but a constant and irritating fire from remote hills and jungle shelters. I remember best of all the fourth day of the campaign ; and the recollections re-form themselves now much in the same words that made up my letter from the field. ...

read more

"My Most Strenuous Campaign"

Robert Moore Collins

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 35-38

On a stifling night in June, 1896, several men recently arrived from Washington sat on the steps of a Chicago hotel, discussing, as men from Washington invariably do, politics. One was Howard Thompson now engaged in telegraphing to the Associated Press from St. Petersburg official fabrications of the destruction of Japanese armadas. ...

read more

"In Modoc"

Paul Cowles

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 39-42

That was the telegraphic despatch received in the San Francisco office of the Associated Press one afternoon in the spring of 1901 that resulted in an exciting experience in my career. Even in California news of sentence passed by Judge Lynch upon one man is of more than ordinary interest, and when the news came that the distinguished jurist had settled the fate of five men at one time, the wires were made hot with telegrams demanding the story. ...

read more

"How Stephen Crane took Juana Dias"

Richard Harding Davis

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 43-46

At the close of the Spanish-American campaign, the American forces that landed in Porto Rico, were supposed to be invading a hostile territory. Politically, as a colony of the enemy, the inhabitants of the island should have been hostile, but they were not. They received our troops with one hand open and the other presenting either a bouquet, or a bottle. ...

read more

"He That Died o' Wednesday"

Oscar Davis

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 47-48

All his life the Major had been only "the son of his father." Boyhood, youth and early manhood he spent basking in the sunshine of the older man's greatness. Wealth and social position were his without thought. There was no need to strive. ...

read more

"One Day's Work in Cuba"

William Dinwiddie

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 49-54

There are thrills and thrills in the life of every war correspondent, and I am tempted to indulge in introspective analysis of my feelings when attempting to select that commanding moment where my climax of human emotion was reached. ...

read more

"A Startling Surprise"

M. H. Donohoe

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 55-58

It was in April, 1900. The dark days of the early South African campaign were now numbered among the events of a nation's history and Lord Roberts at the head of a magnificent army was sweeping towards Pretoria. I attached myself to the cavalry paving the way for the onward movement that was intended to envelop the principal towns of the Transvaal. ...

read more

"The Penalty of War Corresponding"

W. H. Donald

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 59-64

Through the nebulous mists hanging in thick, clammy folds, over the Eastern Sea but a month ago shot the piercing, opalescent rays of a far-reaching flashlight. Horizontally, perpendicularly, obliquely, the light clove the nether dark of the night like the ghost of a great knife. Now it hesitated as some fishing junk came within its focus, and anon it trembled as a lesser object rose upon the swelling sea. ...

read more

"February 8th"

Robert L. Dunn

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 65-68

On the momentous night of Febr. 8th, 1904, I was representing Collier's Weekly in Chemulpo, Korea. The cold was intense. In my heavy ulster I carried a magnesium flash lamp and alt its paraphernalia. Being the only photographer in that part of the country, and realising the value of the unprecedented opportunity, I had for two weeks been working with jerky haste to and from Seoul, twenty-five miles away. ...

read more

"The Cowboy and the Rattlesnake"

Martin Egan

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 69-72

I would write of a large rattlesnake, a great, lumbering, half-waked boy, an early morning,, and a change of careers. I was the overgrown youth and it was the rattlesnake that gave me the thrill of my life and converted a discouraged young cowboy into an indifferent reporter. In my early youth my thoughts and hopes ran not to the sea and piracy but to the plains of the Great West. ...

read more

"How South Americans Fight"

Edwin Emerson

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 73-78

It was my good fortune—or misfortune according to the point of view—to take a hand two or three years ago in one of the little border wars that spring up periodically between South American States, when they don't happen to be in the throes of a revolution. I went as a correspondent; I stayed as a soldier; I returned as an invalid. ...

read more

"The Hat and the Ha'penny"

John Fox

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 79-82

The penny is a luck piece, but the hat stood incidentally for a piece of luck. The penny hangs on my watch-chain and is one of the two superstitions that are left me, the other being the Star of Theodore Roosevelt. The hat was not my own, and is not now, but I wore it once in the Kentucky mountains, looking for the owner with another purpose than to restore. ...

read more

"A Night Attack on Boshof"

Reginald Glossop

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 83-86

It was a chilly experience, even for Africa. It took place at Boshof, in the Orange River Colony, on November 22nd, 1901, during the Boer war. I was with my regiment, the 4th Scottish Rifles (the Cameronians). Colonel Courtenay (afterwards C. B.) was commandant of the garrison. We were waiting for orders to advance towards Hopstadt and Kroonstadt. ...

read more

"With Colonel Yankoff: A Balkan Episode"

A. G. Hales

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 87-90

Like the hollow of a giant's hand, the valley lay girt round with hills, great hills that rose majestic in their solemn splendour ; flanked with black pines and covered with wondrous wreaths of snow, grim, gaunt and grey they stood like sentinels of time, watching the footsteps of the passing years—God's outposts amidst the wilderness of trees. ...

read more

"A Mango and a Rumor"

James H. Hare

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 91-94

A few nights after the fight at San Juan, in Cuba, I decided to make a hurried trip to Daiquiri, where the first landing of American troops had been made, for the purpose of photographing the landing of the siege guns from the steamer Orizaba. Daiquiri was about twenty miles from the front and my old friend James Burton agreed to go with me. ...

read more

"The Break-up"

D. H. James

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 95-96

It was one of those "good camp nights," when the wolverine's voice, blending sweetly with the vocal efforts of a near-by lynx, softly lulled you to sleep. ...

read more

"A Trip to New York as a Steward"

Oliver S. Kendall

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 97-100

Although the following is not an experience of a war correspondent, there was a time when I made the experiment of a trip to New York as a steward in the steerage of a White Star Liner, and I hope the following may be of interest. ...

read more

"A Veldt Vendetta"

George H. Kingswell

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 101-104

" Give us your most exciting war experience," said the Editor of this unique publication. Here's mine. I nearly died with the Irish Brigade in Natal. It was my own fault. I discovered a most bitter feeling among the Durban-Light Infantry towards the Dublin Fusiliers. I investigated the affair, and knew enough of the facts to take part in the climax. ...

read more

"Treasure Trove"

Walter Kirton

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 105-106

The man whose trade is war, either as a soldier or otherwise, has had — and always will have— many encounters with this comprehensive enertiy. This, doubtless, in many people's minds, accounts for his susceptibility to the charms of Bacchus when the multi-coloured libations to that hilarious god are procurable. ...

read more

"How I Was Nearly Beheaded" and ".o"

E. F. Knight

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 107-112

Perhaps the most interesting ten minutes of my life was the occasion when I was being tried by a very irregular drum-head court-martial and had every reason to believe that the separation of my head from my body was about to be effected without superfluous formality or delay. ...

read more

"Saving a Column"

Lancelot F. Lawton

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 113-116

At the time during the South African war when there were grave fears that a serious rising would take place in Cape Colony, I was attached to one of the flying columns operating under General French. Everything was sacrificed to obtain the utmost possible limit of mobility. ...

"Waiting"

Bryan Leighton

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 117-118

read more

"R. T. P. s"

Richard H. Little

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 119-122

" Because," replied the telegraph operator, "in the first place you say, ' I came,' thus betraying military movements. In the second place you say, ' I saw,' betraying a military observation ; and in the third place you say, ' I conquered,' thereby betraying military secrets and putting the defeated enemy in possession of an important fact. And besides, the censor will think that ' Veni ' is a code word." ...

read more

"A Camera and a Journey"

Jack London

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 123-130

I journeyed all day from Yokohama to Kobe to catch a steamer for Chemulpo, which last city is on the road to Seoul. I journeyed all day and all night from Kobe to Nagasaki to catch a steamer for Chemulpo. I journeyed back all day from Nagasaki to Moji to catch a steamer for Chemulpo. On Monday morning, in Moji, I bought my ticket for Chemulpo, to sail on Monday afternoon. ...

read more

"Nippon Banzai"

George Lynch

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 131-134

" Dai Nippon Teikoku Banzai," how the cry recalls the memory of the most picturesque fight I have seen — the attack on the East gate of Pekin by the Japanese in 1900. Soon after daybreak they had endeavoured to blow up the gate but the Chinese fire from the gatehouse and wall was too hot. Then they shelled it with 64 guns but little or no impression was made upon the solid centuries old masonry. ...

read more

"An Unpleasant Choice"

R. J. MacHugh

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 135-140

The editors of this volume have conveyed a suggestion to me that I should write them an account of what I think the most interesting ten minutes of my experience as a war correspondent. It is not easy to comply with a demand like that. Looking backwards I am convinced that the pleasantest period I ever experienced was when I entered a ramshackle " Eetkammer" on the Durban-Pretoria Railway ...

read more

"An Attempt That Failed"

W. Maxwell

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 141-144

After months of hard fighting and marching we drew near to Johannesburg. The army under Lord Roberts bivouaced on the veldt and day and night the crack of rifle and booming of cannon echoed among the hills that barred our way to the Golden City. We chafed at the delay, fearing that French's cavalry would be the first to enter. ...

read more

"War's Mercies and War's Satires"

Frederick Palmer

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 145-148

Of two officers whom I know well, F. was quiet and modest to a fault ; H. was fond of words and himself to a fault. The bearing of one made a heavy fire seem slight; that of the other made a slight fire seem heavy. F. had led in many charges, but the bullet that cut an artery in his chest found him standing among a group of staff officers. " Is it bad ? " he asked softly of the surgeon in whose arms he rested. ...

read more

"The War and the Walker"

Percival Phillips

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 149-154

A small, condensed war was fought in the southeastern corner of Europe seven years ago. It was fought and finished in less time than the Campaign of the Imperial Hotel has occupied. This was annoying, especially to correspondents who missed steamer connections and to one of the military attaches, whose new uniform was not finished before the treaty of peace was signed. ...

read more

"Adrift on an Ice-Pack"

F. Lionel Pratt

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 155-158

" Battle, murder and sudden death " are presumably the subjects best adapted to a sketch of the type demanded by the editors of this enlightened volume. My experience of the first lies in. the future, across the islet-studded Korean Straits; the second I have not yet committed, though if the Japanese War Office keeps me anchored in Tokyo much longer my hands will indubitably be stained by Secretarial gore ; ...

read more

"An Adventure in Bulgaria"

Melton Prior

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 159-162

It was during the Russo-Turkish War that the little incident which I have endeavoured to illustrate took place. I had followed for some six months the fortunes of the Turkish troops and had been present at many a hard fought battle. The army under the command of Nedjib Pasha was encamped waiting for further Instructions from Constantinople. ...

read more

"Taking It Lying Down"

Guy H. Scull

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 163-166

Under ordinary circumstances, when a man calls you a liar there is only one thing to be done. He may say you prevaricate, or that he does not believe you ; all the same he has called you a liar, and a certain series of results usually follow. Now the offense of telling another man in all seriousness that he lies is a great one; ...

read more

"Without Orders"

Arther Smallwood

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 167-170

I fancy this volume , will teem with South African experiences, but what can one write otherwise,, when one's most adventurous incidents all occurred there, with the stern reminder ever before him that it must be his most thrilling adventure. ...

read more

"A Message from Andree"

Gordon Smith

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 171-176

Victoria, B. C., is a journalistic outpost and I have had many interesting experiences there. One week — it was during that rush to the Klondike's goldfields — was Full of experiences. The coming of Mr. Tilton, mate of the whaler Belvedere, who had walked across Alaska from Point Barrow and taken passage south from Valdes on the little steam schooner Albion, started the week's excitement. ...

read more

"The Canadians at Paardeberg"

Richmond Smith

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 177-182

It was the night before the final decisive attack upon the larger of the Boer General, Cronje, which resulted in the surrender of the man in whom, on the Western frontier, the enemy placed most reliance, together with some four thousand of his followers. ...

read more

"A Fiji Incident"

Sydney Smith

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 183-186

"Write within 1000 words an account of the most interesting incident actually experienced in your career!" That's what the Yankees would call a difficult proposition. My ideas of what is interesting may differ entirely with the ideas of the apocryphal Benjamin Binns; however, here goes. ...

read more

"The Devotions of an Emperor"

W. S. Straight

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 187-190

The Peking cart, an abominable vehicle in the best of weather, jolted and tumbled and bumped and splashed through the foul sea of mud that stretched, inky and noisome, between the low walls flanking the alley-ways or the tightly battened shop fronts that bordered the larger thoroughfares. A lonely light here and there sent its tail of yellow streaking across the rain-swept puddles. ...

read more

"Impression Pénible"

C. Victor Thomas

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 191-192

Impression penible! oui, tres penible meme et cette impression je 1'ai eue le samedi 20 fevrier, 1904, a mon arrivee au Japon. ...

read more

"How I Selected a Campaign Outfit"

Sam B. Trissel

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 193-196

I have been asked to write about my most interesting experience as a newspaper man. It would be difficult for me to select the most interesting experience I have met with since I have been a member of the profession/ I have had many interesting experiences, which vary all the way from assisting a trio of medical students rob a graveyard to watching soldiers kill one another. ...

read more

"Sognando"

Alberto Troise

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 197-200

E solamente mezz'ora che mi son levato dal letto e ti scrivo. Ti scrivo mentre fuori tutto e silente ; tutto dorme ancora nella quiete ! II Sole, facendo capolino dalle vette delle lontane montagne, viene a baciare, con i suoi raggi dorati, le corolle dischiuse al bacio della tenue mattinata primaverile e la pallida luna piegando semprepiu ad ovest, viene a rischiarare la nnestra tua. ...

read more

"Saved by a Desert Quail"

Grant Wallace

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 201-206

It was a mere incident, just a bit out of the " damnable ordinary," quite unimportant to all the world excepting only to Carmelita, me — and the rattlesnake. ...

read more

"A Boxer Charge"

Fred Whiting

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 207-208

Under the ancient walls of the Tayar city towards the end of the unique campaign of 1900, a column of German infantry, with baggage and provisions for a three day's expedition, is slowly moving through the heavy sand in a southwesterly direction. ...

"Four Stone Ten"

Sheldon Williams

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 209-210

Appendix 1. Painful Impression: Translation of C. Victor Thomas's "Impression Pénible"

Carey Cupit

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 211-212

Appendix 2. Dreaming!: Translation of Alberto Troise's "Sognando!"

Dennis G. Martinez

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 213-215

Image Plates

pdf iconDownload PDF