Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-ix

Translators

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pp. x-xii

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Preface

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pp. xiii-xxviii

Volume 10 of the Collected Works of Marx and Engels covers the period from the autumn of 1849 to the summer of 1851. The bourgeois-democratic revolutions which swept across the European continent in 1848-49 had ended in defeat. The last centres of insurrection in Germany, Hungary and Italy had been suppressed in the summer of 1849. In France, the victory of the counterrevolution was already clearing the way for the coup d'état of Louis Bonaparte on December...

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Works

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pp. 1-4

Sir,— The Times of Friday lastb contains a letter signed "Anti- Socialist", denouncing to the English public, and to the English Home-Secretary,0 some of the "hellish doctrines" developed in the London German Newspaper, by a certain Mr. Charles Heinzen, described as a "shining light of the German Social Democratic party". These "hellish doctrines...

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1-5

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pp. 5-44

The periodical bears the title of the newspaper of which it is to be considered the continuation. One of its tasks will consist in returning in retrospect to the period which has elapsed since the suppression of the Neue Rheinische Zeitung3 The greatest interest of a newspaper, its daily intervention in the movement and speaking directly from the heart of the movement, its reflecting day-to-...

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6-10

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pp. 45-270

With the exception of only a few chapters, every more important part of the annals of the revolution from 1848 to 1849 carries the heading: Defeat of the Revolution! What succumbed in these defeats was not the revolution. It was the pre-revolutionary traditional appendages, results of social relationships which had not yet come to the point of sharp class antagonisms— persons, illusions...

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11-15

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pp. 271-341

It has generally been the habit of the champions of the working classes to meet the argument of the free-trading middle classes, of what is called the "Manchester School",216 by mere indignant comments upon the immoral and impudently-selfish character of their doctrines. The working man, ground down to the dust, trodden upon, physically ruined and mentally exhausted by a haughty class of money-loving mill-lords, the working man, certainly, would deserve.

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16-20

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pp. 342-352

Our readers will recall that in our previous issue we showed how the finance aristocracy in France regained power. We took the opportunity to refer to the association of Louis Napoleon and Fould in the execution of profitable coups on the Stock Exchange.a It has already been noted that since Fould joined the Cabinet Louis Napoleon's unceasing demands on the Legislative Assembly for money have suddenly...

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21-25

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pp. 353-380

In the years 1848 and '49, there was published, in Cologne, a German daily paper, the Neue Rheinische Zeitung (New Rhenish Gazette). This paper, edited by Charles Marx, chief editor, Frederick Engels, George Weerth, Freiligrath the celebrated poet, F. and W.Wolff, and others, very soon acquired an extraordinary degree of popularity, from the spirited and fearless manner in which it advocated the...

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26-30

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pp. 381-391

Sir, For some time past, we, the undersigned German refugees residing in this country, have had occasion to admire the attention paid to us by the British Government. We were accustomed to meet, from time to time, some obscure servant of the Prussian Ambassador, not being "registered as such according to law"; we were accustomed to the ferocious spouting...

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31-35

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pp. 392-485

The all-engrossing topic now in Germany is, of course, the Schleswig-Holstein affair. As this affair is in your country, as well as in France, very little understood, you will allow me to give a rapid view of it. It has been shown clearly enough that the small independent states by which Germany is surrounded are, under a more or less liberal form, the chief seats of reaction. Thus Belgium, the model state of Constitutionalism...

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36-40

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pp. 486-539

"The abolition of the state has meaning with the Communists, only as the necessary consequence of the abolition of classes, with which the need for the organised might of one class to keep the others down automatically disappears. In bourgeois countries the abolition of the state means that the power of the state is reduced to the level found in North America. There, the class contradictions are but incompletely developed; every clash between the classes is concealed by the outflow of the surplus proletarian population to the west; intervention by the...

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41-43

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pp. 540-580

Sir, In your paper of to-day, I find a letter from M. Louis Blanc,a referring to the Banquet des Egaux, held in London on the 24th of February, and to^ a certain toast sent thither by M. Blanqui, the prisoner in Belle-Ile-en-mer. Allow me to make a few observations upon this letter. At the banquet...

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From the Preparatory Materials

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pp. 581-592

1) Supremacy of Russia emerging openly. Hegemony divided between Prussia and Austria. The minor states formally secured once more thanks to their rivalry, true. But the princes of the minor states (e. g. Hesse,416 Baden) disgraced in the eyes of most Germans, and thus the differences between the various houses and small townships,...

Appendices

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pp. 593-638

Notes and Indexes

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pp. 639-640

Notes

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pp. 641-709

Name Index

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pp. 710-741

Index of Quoted and Mentioned Literature

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pp. 742-759

Index of Periodicals

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pp. 760-764

Subject Index

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pp. 765-787