Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Foreword

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pp. v-vi

The ability to read English prose with ease and understanding is one mark of an educated American. The desire to follow the thoughts of men through the rich and varied forms of English expression is a further distinguishing evidence of cultivation. ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-viii

Progress in the study of college problems is impossible without the cooperation of numerous faculty members. Certain merits that the present study may have must be attributed, therefore, to the combined efforts of more individuals than can be named here. ...

Contents

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pp. ix-xvi

Part I. Introduction

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Chapter I. The Problem

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pp. 3-5

The reading abilities of elementary school children have been under the scrutiny of able investigators throughout a period of years. As a result of extensive researches and widespread attention to the problem the method of teaching reading in the classroom has been radically modified. ...

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Chapter II. A Review of the Literature

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pp. 6-14

The recent literature relative to reading habits is not only vast in quantity but extensive in scope. Evidence of this fact is readily accessible in Gray's Summary of Investigations Relating to Reading1 and the five supplements that have been published since the first monograph came from the press. ...

Part II. Reading Tests and Scales

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Chapter III. The Minnesota Reading Examination for College Students, Revised Form

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pp. 17-40

That comprehension is fundamentally essential for effective reading is axiomatic. The multiplicity of psychological, physiological, and mechanical elements involved in comprehension, however, have never been satisfactorily isolated; and therefore the task of constructing a test to measure comprehension in reading is a complex one. ...

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Chapter IV. Minnesota Reading Examination

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pp. 41-53

Reading has no particular influence in broadening the experiences of an individual unless what is read is retained. One may comprehend while reading and yet immediately following the process forget the ideas expressed by the printed words. This phenomenon practically forces one to the position that comprehension and retention are two separate functions of the reading process. ...

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Chapter V. The Minnesota Speed of Reading Test for College Students

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pp. 54-61

The measurement of rate of reading is no less intricate than the measurement of comprehension. Without doubt it is inextricably bound up with comprehension. The expression of this fact has been well phrased by Foran in his statement that "it is evident that the rate at which a pupil reads is conditioned in part by the purpose of his reading, the nature of the subject matter, and his difficulty in understanding it. ...

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Chapter VI. A Studiousness Rating Scale

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pp. 62-72

The current wave of interest in diagnosing scholastic deficiencies among college students has led to numerous prescriptions relative to study habits. These have been listed in pamphlets and amplified in books without actual evaluation of their efficacy in practical study situations. ...

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Chapter VII. A Vocabulary Test for College Students

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pp. 73-78

The reader may rightfully question at this point the necessity for a general vocabulary test, since Part I of the Minnesota Reading Examination was prepared for the measurement of vocabulary. It will be recalled, however, that the testing time allotted to Part I of the reading test was only six minutes. ...

Part III. Experiments in Reading

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Chapter VIII. An Experiment To Determine the Efficacy of Drills in Reading, Vocabulary, and Study

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pp. 81-108

As stated in the first chapter, the purpose of Reading Experiment I was to study the effect that drills in vocabulary, paragraph reading, and study have upon reading efficiency, vocabulary, marks in English, and marks in all subjects taken by the students. ...

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Chapter IX. An Experiment to Determine the Effect of Vocabulary Exercises: Reading Experiment II

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pp. 109-122

The main problem of the second experiment differed from the first in that it sought to isolate more thoroughly one of the factors involved in reading and to study the effect of more intensive drills upon that factor. Vocabulary exercises were chosen to determine the effect of such drills upon general vocabulary, paragraph reading, speed of reading, and scholastic achievement. ...

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Chapter X. An Experiment to Determine the Effect of Paragraph Reading Exercises: Reading Experiment III

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pp. 123-131

The general purpose of Reading Experiment III was similar to that of Reading Experiment II, since it, too, sought to evaluate a specific type of drill. In lieu of the vocabulary exercises, the emphasis was placed upon paragraph reading in an effort to improve reading comprehension, retention, and scholastic proficiency. ...

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Chapter XI. An Additional Experiment to Evaluate Vocabulary Drills: Reading Experiment IV

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pp. 132-180

The results of the experiments reported in the last three chapters are consistent in showing that vocabulary exercises are effective to the extent that students improve their scores on the vocabulary tests which overlap the drills. This improvement, however, appeared to be only temporary. ...

Appendix

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pp. 181-200

Bibliography

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pp. 201-204

Index

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pp. 205-208