Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page, Dedication

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Contents

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xi

Many people helped me as I wrote this book. Michael Palencia-Roth has been an unfailing mentor and model of ethical, rigorous scholarship and human compassion. I am grateful for his generous help at many stages of writing this manuscript...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-14

Why is the District of Columbia, the capital of the United States, named after Christopher Columbus, a Genoese explorer commissioned by Spain who never set foot on the future US mainland? Why did Spanish Americans in 1819 name the...

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1. Columbus’s Appropriation of Imperial Discourse

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pp. 15-43

Christopher Columbus has long been the subject of disagreement among historians. The protracted debate about his origins, whether he was Genoan, Spanish, Jewish, Catalán, etc., is merely the tip of the iceberg that seems to have had a special...

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2. The Incorporation of Columbus into the Story of Western Empire

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pp. 44-65

Woodcuts of Columbus’s ships illustrate the 1493 Basle edition of Columbus’s popular “Letter on the Discovery.” Nine years later, these same woodcuts were reused to illustrate not a text written by or about Columbus, but a popular edition of Virgil’s works...

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3. Columbus and the Republican Empire of the United States

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pp. 66-105

By the eighteenth century, Columbus was commonly represented in Europe according to an interpretive tradition that had enveloped him as a protagonist in the classic Western story of imperial conquest and domination. Many of the texts that formed...

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4. Colombia: Discourses of Empire in Spanish America

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pp. 106-144

Before Colombia was declared an independent state in 1819, the terms “Colombia” and “Colombiano” were used by many Spanish American patriots to mean “America” and “American,” just as the corresponding terms in English were used in the North...

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Conclusion: The Meaning of Empire in Nationalist Discourses of the United States and Spanish America

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pp. 145-152

As discussed in detail in the Introduction, in the last decade or so an increasing number of scholars have critiqued the dominance of the nation-state as a unit of analysis. In doing so, they have challenged exceptionalist views of US history, according...

Notes

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pp. 153-178

Works Cited

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pp. 179-194

Index

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pp. 195-201