Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-v

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Preface

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pp. vii-ix

IT is customary to view personnel work in all its ramifications as a very recent innovation, dating from about 1910, although some industrial firms were conducting training programs prior to that date. But it is well to realize that the conception of personnel work has long been in existence...

Contents

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pp. xi-xiv

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1. Purpose and Procedure

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pp. 3-16

If a man has an A rating on lawyer interest, a B rating on engineer interest, and a C rating on accountant interest, is there established evidence that the man should go into law, not accounting? What are the chances that he actually will become a lawyer or engineer? What are the chances...

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2. Interest Scores in College and Occupations 18 Years After

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pp. 17-35

The basic data consist of 34 occupational interest scores of 663 former college students, tested while in college and retested in 1949, together with their occupational record giving occupational choice while in college and occupation engaged in, in 1949. As an example, the test...

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3. Differentiation of Employed from Non-Employed

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pp. 36-54

The preceding chapter showed that college students average a B rating in the occupation in which they will be employed 18 years later, a score which is 85 per cent of what might be expected from a new criterion group. The significance of this finding depends...

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4. Estimates of Interest Profiles by Experts

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pp. 55-61

THE primary question in this chapter is that of the two preceding chapters, namely: Does the vocational outcome of students agree with their occupational interests when in college? But here estimates of "experts" are employed to measure the degree of agreement between...

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5. Permanence of Interest Scores

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pp. 62-66

"PERMANENCE of interest scores is somewhat less than for intelligence test scores but more permanent over the college period than college grades, and distinctly higher than for attitude test scores" (4). Present data reaffirm this conclusion of 1943....

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6. Interest Scores of Heterogeneous Groups of Students

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pp. 67-72

HOW does a heterogeneous sample of college students score on a given occupational scale? In Chapters 2 to 4 we were concerned with how college students score on the scale appropriate to their 1949 occupation. In this chapter we are concerned with how 663 students score on a...

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7. Variability of Scores

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pp. 73-78

STABILITY or permanence of interest scores has been considered in Chapter 5 in terms of correlations between test and retest scores. But correlations of .48 to .79 do not preclude some large differences in individual cases....

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8. Change in Scores over Eighteen Years

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pp. 79-89

CHANGES in scores over an interval of time may be attributed to many factors. Among these are maturation, acquired experience in one's work, and change in occupation. What evidence is there that these three factors affect interest scores?...

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9. Why Interests and Future Occupations Vary

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pp. 90-97

Validity of criterion. The predictive validity of a test has to be an expression of how well the test scores agree with the criterion, which in this study is occupation engaged in. By employing this criterion the author tacitly assumes it has merit. But he doesn't know how good...

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10. Satisfaction

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pp. 98-118

SEVERAL explanations were given in Chapter 1 as to why the author has not used satisfaction as the criterion against which to check his interest test scores. One of the explanations is that satisfaction pertaining to occupational activity is not a distinct entity, separate from...

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11. The Masculinity-Femininity Scale

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pp. 119-126

THE MF scale contrasts the interests of males and females. It has an oddeven reliability of .932, the third highest reliability of all scales for men; the author scale has a reliability of .938 and the engineer scale .937. The test-retest correlation for 200 freshmen over a 19-year...

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12. The Occupational Level Scale

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pp. 127-136

THE OL scale contrasts the interests of 258 unskilled men with P, i.e., business and professional men (8, Chapter 10). The range of mean (not individual) scores is only 19, whereas the typical occupational scale has about 80 per cent greater range. The norms of a scale...

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13. Interests and Prediction

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pp. 137-145

Six criteria of interest may be mentioned — four qualitative and two quantitative (2, 5). Three of the criteria—attention, being stirred, and objects — are mentioned in the definition of interest from Webster's dictionary, which reads: "a propensity to attend...

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14. Abilities vs. Interests

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pp. 146-156

"WHEN we talk about the relationships between interests and abilities we mean the relationship between interests and abilities as observed in behavior or as shown by test scores. It is better to talk about relationship between interests and achievements than between interests...

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15. Problems and New Developments

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pp. 157-182

THE writer had originally planned to review the literature on interests as a part of this text. The literature has, however, become so voluminous that it would require a great deal of time to cover the subject properly and surveying it would postpone publication...

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16. Vocational Guidance

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pp. 183-199

IT has been said that "A successful man is one who is doing the work he likes best — and is getting paid for it." The objective of vocational guidance can very well be to make all men successful in the sense of this remark....

Index

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pp. 201-207