Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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p. v

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Preface: Will Sprawl Produce Its Own Demise?

William S. Saunders

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pp. vii-ix

Sprawl”—the uncontrolled expansion of low-density, single- use suburban development into the countryside— resents itself as the single most significant and urgent issue in American land use around the turn of the century. Just as the word sprawl has entered common...

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Introduction: Beyond Sprawl

Robert Fishman

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pp. xi-xviii

Jane Jacobs’s admonition—“A city cannot be a work of art”—applies with special force to urban designers’ attempts to re-form the radically innovative low- density city we persist in calling “suburbs” or “sprawl.” Jacobs was not condoning ugliness; rather, her concern...

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1. Seventy-five Percent: The Next Big Architectural Project

Ellen Dunham-Jones

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pp. 1-20

It is a well-recognized if unwelcome fact of architectural life: architects design only a small percentage of what gets built in the United States. Still, it is astonishing that in the past quarter century a vast landscape has been produced without the kind of buildings that architects...

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2. The New Urbanism and the Communitarian Trap: On Social Problems and the False Hope of Design

David Harvey

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pp. 21-26

On returning to Oakland after many years of absence, Gertrude Stein remarked that “there is no there there.” This is often taken as a simple condemnation of the impoverished qualities of American urban life, a comment that came naturally to someone who viewed America...

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3. Ozzie and Harriet in Hell: On the Decline of Inner Suburbs

Mike Davis

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pp. 27-33

Once upon a time, a placid town, celebrated in millions of picture postcards, basked in the golden glow of its orchards. In the 1920s it was renowned as the Queen of the Citrus Belt, with one of the highest per capita incomes in the nation. In the 1940s it was so...

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4. Suburbia and Its Discontents: Notes from the Sprawl Debate

Matthew J. Kiefer

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pp. 34-43

Most Americans don’t think much about the design of the built environment, odd though this may seem to those who do. But every so often broader issues bubble up into public discourse. The debate over sprawl, until recently confined to land-use planning circles, seems...

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5. The Costs—and Benefits?—of Sprawl

Alex Krieger

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pp. 44-56

In the growing literature on sprawl, a predominant view holds urban sprawl accountable for much that is wrong with America. This is the view of New Urbanists, among others, who consider sprawl a recent and aberrant form of urbanization that threatens even the American...

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6. Smart Growth in Atlanta: A Response to Krieger and Kiefer

Ellen Dunham-Jones

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pp. 57-70

Living in Atlanta, a city whose reputation as the poster child for sprawl precipitated significant ongoing public and private “Smart Growth” initiatives, I have “situated knowledge” of specific examples to both corroborate and question Alex Krieger’s and Matthew Kiefer’s m...

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7. Diversity by Law: On Inclusionary Zoning and Housing

Jerold S. Kayden

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pp. 71-73

At a time when the real estate market has made it increasingly difficult for American cities to foster or maintain social and economic diversity, “diversity by law” zoning programs are attracting new attention. Using such labels as “inclusionary zoning” and “inclusionary...

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8. The Spectacle of Ordinary Building

Mitchell Schwarzer

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pp. 74-90

In The Society of the Spectacle, Guy Debord defined the world of the spectacle as corresponding to that “moment when the commodity has attained the total occupation of social life.” In the decades since Debord’s 1967 manifesto, the commodity—the central feature of the...

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9. Privatized Lives: On the Embattled ’Burbs

James S. Russell

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pp. 91-109

A recent New York Times story captures a dilemma that has become all too familiar at the developing edges of urban America. In 1978 Carol and Dennis Ferry thought they had found their close-to-nature dream when they moved from a starter home in Trenton, New Jersey,...

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10. Duct Tape Nation: Land Use, the Fear Factor, and the New Unilateralism

Andrew Ross

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pp. 110-121

In the fall of 2002, a pair of snipers brought terror to the suburban strongholds around Washington, DC, claiming as many as ten victims over several weeks. A striking consequence of their shooting spree was the spectacle of suburbanites driving to urban gas pumps to fill up their...

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11. Retro Urbanism: On the Once and Future TOD

Peter Hall

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pp. 122-129

The point that worried Peter Calthorpe, over lunch last spring in Berkeley, is this: why does “New Urbanism” always seem to want to wear old clothes? Visit any of the archetypes—Poundbury, Kentlands, Celebration—and you are immediately borne back into the past. Poundbury...

Contributors

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pp. 131-132