Cover

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Title Page, About the Series, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-v

Contents

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p. vii

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Preface

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pp. ix-x

The manuscript of this book was in the final stages of revision when worldwide attention was riveted by the attacks on New York and Washington, D.C., on September 11, 2001. The English version of the manuscript was in final revisions at the time of the first anniversary...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xii

This book is part of a dialogue. It does not pretend to offer a full or final interpretation of its subject. Rather, it should be seen as a halt in a longer-term trajectory: assessing developments in the field in order to pose new issues for future work. In this dialogue,...

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Introduction

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pp. xiii-xix

Reading the newspapers in Argentina, Uruguay, Chile, Brazil, Paraguay, and Peru at the turn of the millennium may sometimes resemble traveling through a time tunnel. In addition to the obvious economic, political, and police problems of the moment, the news...

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1. Memory in the Contemporary World

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pp. 1-7

We live in an era of collectors. We record and save everything: pictures from childhood and souvenirs from grandmothers in private and family life, newspaper and magazine clippings referring to issues or events of interest, making up official and private archives...

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2. What Memories Are We Talking About?

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pp. 8-25

The draft title for this chapter was “What is memory?” Such a title invites a single and univocal definition of the term. Though not involving a logical contradiction, asking what memory is (in singular) may seem at odds with offering to study processes of memory...

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3. Political Struggles for Memory

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pp. 26-45

The past is gone, it is already de-termin(at)ed; it cannot be changed. The future, by contrast, is open, uncertain, and indeterminate. What can change about the past is its meaning, which is subject to reinterpretations, anchored in intentions and expectations...

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4. History and Social Memory

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pp. 46-59

The relationship between memory and history is nowadays a central preoccupation within several fields of the social sciences. Debates and reflection on the subject are most extensive and intensive within the discipline of history itself, particularly among...

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5. Trauma, Testimony, and “Truth”

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pp. 60-75

What can people who lived through “unbearable” situations say or tell about them? What ethical, political, and more generally human issues are involved? Debates about testimony pervade practically every disciplinary field, from literary criticism to the broader...

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6. Engendered Memories

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pp. 76-88

If we close our eyes and attempt to envision the “human” side of the dictatorships in the Southern Cone, one image dominates the scene: the Madres de Plaza de Mayo. Then, other women come into sight: the Familiares, Abuelas, Viudas, Comadres (Relatives...

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7. Transmissions, Legacies, Lessons

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pp. 89-102

Immediately following the end of World War II, some Jewish survivors were able to maintain (or recuperate) their private cultural lives, in which Yiddish occupied a central place. Their collective culture, however, was lost. “The massacre was not simply the...

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Conclusion

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pp. 103-105

Many open questions remain. In these concluding remarks, I want to take up an issue that, although frequently mentioned throughout the text, merits further discussion. The issue is that in addition to cultural and symbolic considerations, it is important to...

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Appendix: A Chronology of Political Violence and Human Rights Movements

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pp. 107-133

This section chronicles forty-eight years of political violence, state terrorism, institutional processes, and human rights movements in the Southern Cone (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Paraguay, and Uruguay). The selection of events is not arbitrary, but like all chronologies...

Notes

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pp. 135-148

Works Cited

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pp. 149-156

Index

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pp. 157-163

About the Author

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p. 165