Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xii

In bringing this book to completion, I owe a great deal of thanks to many friends, family, and colleagues for their unfailing encouragement, criticism, support, badgering, and patience. To Robert Fernea, who supervised an earlier incarnation of this book as a doctoral thesis, I owe a deep appreciation for my intellectual formation in anthropology, ...

read more

Retrospective: U.S. “Expertise” and Ethnographic Egypt

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-10

In 1980, according to a reported estimate, there were 1,116 U.S. “experts” working in Egypt on U.S. AID development projects.1 This figure can be expanded to include Egyptian scholars and scientists who supplemented meager salaries (from $100 to $150 per month) by cooperating with AID-sponsored projects,2 ...

read more

1. Poetics and Political Economy

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 11-32

Picture, if you will, a mud-brick potter’s workshop in 1980 Cairo. An Egyptian potter sits turning pot after pot upon his wheel. His young apprentice transfers completed pots to a drying area already crowded with dozens of identical vessels and supplies his master with fresh Nile clay prepared in pits dug into the ground outside. ...

read more

2. Ethnographic Inscriptions

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 33-60

As the bus to Misr al-Qadimah (Old Cairo) pulls into the open-air terminal on Midan al-Tahrir (Independence Square, later renamed Sadat Square), the waiting crowd becomes attentive and alive with commotion as everyone gathers up their baskets, satchels, and children, to jostle their way toward the open doors and prepare for the inevitable mad crush of entry. ...

read more

3. From Dissolution to Preservation: Egyptian Artisanry in the Early Twentieth Century

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 61-90

My own ethnographic fieldwork focused on the pottery industry, a craft that long preceded Egypt’s integration into the capitalist world market and that continues to enjoy a viable, though reduced, market for its utilitarian water jars and other assorted clay pots. ...

read more

4. Closing in on Crisis: The Informal Sector since the 1970s

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 91-112

By the late 1970s, Egyptian petty commodity production had become a concern for both international development agency research and Egypt’s national reconstruction in a transnational field. These artisanal, small-scale industries and their skilled craftworkers were also made the butt of complaints in the press and among the popular classes in Egypt. ...

read more

5. From Preservation to Simulation: Paradox of Postmodernity

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 113-138

Chapter 3 sketched the moment of modernism in early-twentieth-century Egypt when the relation between petty commodity production and the wider political economy shifted from dissolution to (paradoxical) preservation. These forms of production became integral to ensuring the social reproduction of modern capital accumulation in the periphery and in the metropole. ...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 139-148

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 149-160

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 161-168

read more

About the Author

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Kristin Koptiuch is associate professor of anthropology at Arizona State University West. Her interdisciplinary interests draw on cultural studies and social theory, transnational culture and political economy, postmodernity, urban space, and colonial discourse. ...