Cover

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Title Page, About the Series, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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p. vii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

I want to thank the following institutions for the support they provided for this project during the years I was writing it, mainly through generous invitations faculty and students extended to me that allowed me to present my work to academic and professional audiences: the National United Methodist Native American Center, Claremont, California; Getty Center for the Arts, Santa Monica...

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Introduction: Reading Experience in Native Nonfiction

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pp. xiii-xxxi

These four chapters—on the nineteenth-century Pequot writer William Apess, the Osage Nation’s 1881 constitution, Native American educational narratives, and N. Scott Momaday’s philosophy of language—are examinations, each in their own way, of two primary concerns. First, they focus on nonfiction texts by Native authors, texts that, taken together, narrate a North American...

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1. Eulogy on William Apess: His Writerly Life and His New York Death

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pp. 1-48

And while you ask yourselves, ‘What do they, the Indians, want?’ you have only to look at the unjust laws made for them and say, ‘They want what I want.’”1 These words, which I have chosen to open this examination of Native nonfiction, were spoken on two occasions in the Odeon Theatre in Boston in January 1836. They are among the last statements that history records...

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2. Democratic Vistas of the Osage Constitutional Crisis

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pp. 49-94

Half a century after Apess ended his writing career, fifteen hundred miles to the west a group of Osage leaders facing drastically different circumstances penned the following words: The Great and Little Osages having united and become one body politic, under the style and title of the Osage Nation; therefore, We the people of the Osage Nation, in National...

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3. The Work of Indian Pupils: Narratives of Learning in Native American Literature

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pp. 95-142

As the 1880s were drawing to a close and the Osages were nearing the end of the first decade of their experiment in constitutional democracy, the print shop of the Santee Normal Training School, which educated Dakota and other Native people in the late nineteenth century, produced a leaflet describing the history and philosophy of the school. The leaflet was a single sheet...

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4. Momaday in the Movement Years: Rereading “The Man Made of Words”

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pp. 143-180

The educational ideology that swept through Native American communities from the beginning of the Progressive Era in the United States set the stage for twentieth-century Native American life. Due to disease, military conquest, and the increasing degradation of reservation life, says Russell Thornton, “Native American population of the United States, Canada, and Greenland” combined...

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Conclusion: Intellectual Trade Routes

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pp. 181-188

Though I have always preferred critical language that is less, rather than more, figural, I have found myself repeatedly fixing on the metaphor of intellectual trade routes as I have considered how to conclude this work. Perhaps the sheer variety of the texts covered here and the vast geography from which their writers have come prompted this image, but my travel itinerary over the...

Appendix: The 1881 Constitution of the Osage Nation

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pp. 189-198

Notes

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pp. 199-214

Bibliography

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pp. 215-232

Index

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pp. 233-244

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About the Author

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pp. 245-245

Robert Warrior is author of Tribal Secrets: Recovering American Indian Intellectual Traditions (Minnesota, 1995) and, with Paul Chaat Smith...