Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. v

read more

Acknowledgements

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vi-viii

I would like to thank the staff over many years at the library of the Terrence Higgins Trust in London, and also the workers at the HIV Project and the National Aids Manual. Such services are literally invaluable in much of my everyday work. I would also like to thank Steve Cook at Cassell for rekindling enthusiasm for this book. ...

read more

Preface (Second Edition)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xiv

The main text of the first edition of Policing Desire was written in the space of six weeks in the early autumn of 1986, with the full expectation of immediate publication. Unfortunately, a number of circumstances combined to delay the book's appearance for more than a year. ...

read more

Preface (Third Edition)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xv-xvi

Policing Desire went into a second American edition in 1989, but not in Britain where Routledge decided not to republish it. For this new edition I have lightly edited the original text in a few places, and added a new conclusion. ...

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-6

Turning the pages of my Sunday newspaper recently, I came across a photograph of a man pushing another man's head down into a large bucket. Over the edge of the bucket emerges a pair of rubber gloves, like something struggling to clamber out. In the background there is one sign which reads "Gents Hairdresser", ...

read more

1. Sex, diversity and disease

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 7-21

In January, 1986, I lost a friend to Aids. I weigh these words carefully, as I weigh my sense of loss, and my motives for writing this book. My died from one of the many opportunistic infections to which the body is prey when its defensive immune system has been extensively damaged. ...

read more

2. Infectious desires

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 22-37

This book is concerned with precisely such "discharges", with the ways in which Aids is made to seem to speak on behalf of various social groups, whose moral opinions thus ostensibly emanate from the syndrome itself. It is important to unmask such feats of ideological ventriloquism, ...

read more

3. Moral panics

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 38-57

In 1941 the English novelist Sylvia Townsend Warner wrote to an American friend comparing the German propaganda machine to "a clown with homicidal mania - ludicrous and terrifying both at once".1 However we may personally respond to the general sleep of reason surrounding Aids, we are nonetheless obliged to try to make some wider sense of the social climate in which we find ourselves. ...

read more

4. Aids, pornography and law

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 58-76

In all its variant forms, modern sexuality is policed by laws which regulate and oversee sexual desires, actions and identities. Laws determine child custody rights, ages of sexual consent (currently fixed in Great Britain as sixteen for heterosexual and eighteen for homosexual acts), immigration, and the very distinction between male and female. ...

read more

5. Aids and the press

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 77-96

In August, 1986, the Los Angeles Times Magazine published a "fictional scenario" entitled "AIDS: 1991", "based on what is known about acquired immune deficiency syndrome".1 The cover illustration shows a group of three featureless figures, with the suggestion of numbered identification tags around their necks, standing in a sombre limbo of swirling clouds of brown chalk. ...

read more

6. Aids on television

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 97-121

The reality of Aids is probably no closer to most of the population than the character in Woody Allen's film Hannah And Her Sisters, who observes sadly that her dental hygienist now wears rubber gloves because so many of his clients are gay. The underplaying of the line carries a sharp resonance of loss and regret condensed in the tiny incident—...

read more

7. Safer representations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 122-133

Personal reactions to having Aids are unpredictable. An Aids diagnosis may lead to an immediate sense of relief that things are out in the open, named and therefore resistable, or to an equally immediate sense of stark, paralysing terror. From somewhere between the two a close friend wrote to me: ...

read more

8. Epilogue

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 134-145

Shortly after the main text of this book had gone to press, the British government announced its commitment to a "forceful" new propaganda campaign "to alert the public to the risks of Aids".1 Advertisements spelled out the word "AIDS" in seasonal gift wrapping paper, together with the accompanying question: ...

read more

Conclusion (Second Edition)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 146-151

Whether we like it or not, we inhabit societies in which other people's diseases are generally held to be about as fascinating and involving as other people's holiday photographs. Even in countries such as Britain and Canada that have socialized medicine, disease is widely regarded as overwhelmingly private. ...

read more

Conclusion (Third Edition)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 152-156

In 1986, the year in which Policing Desire was written, there were 298 cases of Aids diagnosed in the Untied Kingdom, and 18,430 cases diagnosed in the United States. Writing in the summer of 1996, there have to date been 12,565 cases of Aids diagnosed in Britain since the beginning of the epidemic, and well over 500,000 cases diagnosed in the USA.1 ...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 157-166

Resources: 1996

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 167-170

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 171-172