Cover

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Title Page, Frontispiece, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

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Foreword

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pp. v-vi

...on intelligence test scores has called attention to many new problems that can only be solved by long-time investigations. In this monograph the detailed results of a longitudinal study are presented...

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Preface

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pp. vii-x

...the entire period. Some moved away from the city. Some parents lost interest in the study and were unwilling to bring their children for further tests. Some dropped out for other reasons. From time to time others were added to take the places of those...

Contents

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pp. xi-xvi

Part I. Construction of the Minnesota Preschool Scales

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I. Historical Survey

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pp. 3-18

...recent origin. The purpose of the early tests was to distinguish between feebleminded and normal children in school, in order that the feebleminded might be segregated and given special training suitable to their needs...

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II. Standardization of the Scales

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pp. 19-25

...in the preceding chapter, was completed, the construction of a scale to be used with children from the ages of 18 months to 5 years was begun. The earlier study had shown the necessity for careful selection both of the tests and of the children to be tested as well as the desirability...

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III. The Selection of the Tests and Their Arrangement

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pp. 26-34

...greatest weight. However, other studies were reviewed with care and the final scale represents a combination of test items and ideas gleaned from many sources. There follows a detailed discussion of the selection of each of the tests...

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IV. Derivation of the Scale Values

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pp. 35-48

...the fact that the mental year might vary at different levels of chronological age. The usual method of scoring, which takes as a basal age the year at which all the tests are passed and adds to that basal mental age a proportionate number of months for all...

Part II. The Prediction of Later Status from Earlier Status

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V. Some Theoretical Considerations and Their Practical Implications

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pp. 51-53

...of children at each age is representative of a series of populations similar to each other in all respects except age; that the present findings for each of these groups would be duplicated (within the limits of the probable error...

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VI. Relation between Earlier and Later Standing on the Minnesota Preschool Scales

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pp. 54-64

...childhood. Undoubtedly, the widespread attitude that mental measurement is chiefly for the purpose of prediction is a direct outgrowth of the fact that mental tests were originally devised, and have been chiefly used, as bases for practices involving the...

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VII. Correlation between the Minnesota Preschool Scales and the Merrill-Palmer Scale

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pp. 65-70

...that many have been accustomed to think of as having a stable meaning, regardless of the age of the child, is the fact that for this test the standard deviations of mental age do not increase in proportion...

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VIII. Prediction of Standing on the 1916 Stanford-Binet from the Minnesota Preschool Scales

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pp. 71-77

...annual intervals to children who had previously been enrolled in the institute's nursery school, as well as to a fairly large group of outside cases, up to the time when the 1937 revision became available. Thereafter this new form...

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IX. Prediction of Standing on the 1937 Stanford-Binet from the Minnesota Preschool Scales

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pp. 78-81

...difference in favor of the 1937 revision appeared when the fourth edition of the Kuhlmann-Anderson test was used. However, the differences are small, the sampling of subjects is not the same, and there is some reason to think that the mean interval between the...

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X. Prediction of Standing on the Arthur Scale, Form I, from the Minnesota Preschool Scales

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pp. 82-89

...and with those suffering from marked defects of speech or hearing. As a matter of fact, although the instructions are usually given verbally, if necessary they can be communicated for the most part by pantomime...

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XI. Prediction of Standing on College Entrance Tests from the Minnesota Preschool Scales

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pp. 90-92

...for some years administered the American Council on Education college entrance examinations to all Minnesota high school students toward the end of their senior year. Through the courtesy of Dr. John Darley, director of the bureau, records of our subjects who had been given...

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XII. Significance of a Difference in Standing on the Verbal and Nonverbal Scales

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pp. 93-97

...smaller number of items and its somewhat lower reliability as computed at the time of standardization, this scale nevertheless affords a prediction of later standing on well-known tests of intelligence that is as good as or better than that provided by the verbal scale. The superiority...

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XIII. Individual Case Studies

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pp. 98-112

...degrees of cooperation on different occasions, marginal successes and failures, and similar factors that probably can never be brought under perfect control. For these children the changes in IQ from one test to another are commonly not large and show no consistent tendency...

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XIV. Summary and Conclusions

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pp. 113-118

...occurred since that time is natural, perhaps inevitable. Certainly such changes have taken place. It seems pertinent, therefore, in concluding this report, to devote a few paragraphs to the contrast between our earlier concepts and those that have emerged as a result...

Appendix

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pp. 119-123

Bibliography

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pp. 124-126

Author Index

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pp. 127-127

Subject Index

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pp. 128-130