Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, About the Series

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Preface

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pp. v-vi

In any governmental system, federal or unitary, the financial relations between the central government and the other governments in the system are bound to be important. The ability of any unit of government in the system to perform the functions expected of it and to meet the needs of its people depends in large part on the adequacy and the certainty of its supply of revenues. ...

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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1. The Financial Problems of a Federal System

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pp. 1-9

The interesting and important questions that are discussed herein arise from the facts that Minnesota is a state in the Union called the United States, and that the people of the United States establish and carry out their collective policies, raise funds, and support their many public services through a federal system of government. ...

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2. Minnesota's Place and Rank in the Union

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pp. 10-17

Because we, the editors, are using Minnesota as the center of attention in this entire series of studies on intergovernmental relations, and because the state's financial relations with the national government and with its local units affect significantly all the other relations that we deal with, this seems to be an appropriate place to consider Minnesota's place and rank among the states. ...

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3. Minnesota and the Nation: Their Financial Relations, 1783-1913

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pp. 18-28

Those who believe that federal grants to the states are an insidious innovation of recent years should contemplate the history of Minnesota.1 In 1783 the Congress of the United States, representing the people of the thirteen original states (formerly colonies and provinces of Great Britain), concluded their successful war for independence by a treaty of peace with the mother country. ...

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4. Minnesota and the Nation: Their Financial Relations, 1913-1953

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pp. 29-38

In the preceding chapter the initial viewpoint was necessarily that of Minnesota. When statehood was attained, and Minnesota became an equal member in the growing union of states, the early special treatment accorded by Congress to the territory and to the infant state gave way to the more general, and equal or proportionate, treatment accorded to all the states under uniform federal legislation. ...

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5. The Respective Financial Powers of Minnesota and the Nation

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pp. 39-53

When by act of Congress approved by the President Minnesota became a state in 1858, it entered the Union on an equal footing with each and every one of the states that preceded it. The Constitution makes no distinction in powers or status between the original states and the states that were later admitted, and the Supreme Court has made it clear that in its judgment there is no distinction. ...

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6. National and State Taxes in Minnesota, With Special Reference to Overlapping

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pp. 54-67

In Chapter 5 I have tried to show that in stating the legal power to tax, the United States Constitution seems to make very little distinction between what it grants or delegates to the national government and what it reserves by implication to the states. ...

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7. Federal Grants-in-Aid as a Revenue Source in Minnesota

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pp. 68-84

Federal grants-in-aid apply to all the states and to certain territories. The impact of any single grant-in-aid program will vary from state to state, however, and the total effect of all the grants upon the state and local governments will not be the same in any two states. The question is how the federal grants-in-aid affect Minnesota. ...

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8. The National-State Fiscal Balance

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pp. 85-95

There are persons in many states who look upon the national government as a distant and even alien government, and who deplore as unjust to citizens and taxpayers all national expenditures of tax revenues on a wide variety of functions, especially aid to foreign governments and grants to other states than their own. ...

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9. State-Local Revenue Relations in Minnesota

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pp. 96-110

In Chapters 9 and 10, I turn to the financial relations of the state government with the local governments of Minnesota. The discussion will have to be brief and general. The reader will observe that in these chapters as compared with those on recent national-state fiscal relations (Chapters 4 through 8) the amounts of money dealt with are smaller, while the legal relationships and the types of taxes involved are different. ...

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10. State Payments to Local Governments and the State-Local Fiscal Balance

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pp. 111-128

In a nationwide study by the Bureau of the Census covering the year 1952, Minnesota was reported to have paid to local governments within the state in that year over $119 million.1 This amounted to $39.83 per capita, well above the average for all states of $33.06, and put Minnesota in thirteenth place among the states in the per capita amounts of such payments. ...

Index

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pp. 129-131