Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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p. 5

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Introduction

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pp. 6-7

I must have been 10 or 11 years old when I discovered what was to become my favorite place for trainwatching. Not that I had missed much on the Milwaukee railroad scene. Our house was only a half block from the Northern Division main line ...

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Speed

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pp. 8-9

K4'S whipping the Detroit and Chicago Arrows across the Fort Wayne Division in record time. The Great Steel Fleet rolling incessantly behind magnificent Hudsons . . . Toledo, Collinwood, Buffalo . . . mile after mile, night after night, averaging better than 60 miles an hour. ...

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Enter the Hi: "Speedlined" became the adjective

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pp. 10-27

From 12:30 to 1 p.m. on May 29, 1935, radio station WLS in Chicago, 111., broadcast a program which originated not in its studios but beneath the trainshed of Chicago Union Station. ...

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From Tip Top Tap to Beaver Tail: The train that netted $700,000 in a year

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pp. 28-39

The cars of the Hiawatha followed construction patterns nearly identical to the 4400 coaches. The equipment weighed approximately one-third less than conventional standard cars but more than the ultralight articulated diesel trains then coming into use. ...

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Ribbed Cars and 4-6-4'S: What was unprecedented became astounding

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pp. 40-63

New equipment for the Hiawatha was exhibited at Chicago, Milwaukee, scheduled intermediate stops, and the Twin Cities October 5-10, 1936, and entered regular service on the llth — a totally new train (except for motive power) after only 16 months of service. ...

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100 Hits 100: A few figures for skeptics to mull over

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pp. 64-71

The Hiawathas and the great Atlantics and Hudsons that pulled them epitomized the streamlined steam age. In an era when it requires the novel technology of a Turbotrain or the physical plant underwriting a Metroliner to conquer the still magical 100 mph ground-speed barrier, it almost seems legendary that steam-powered Hiawathas regularly ...

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Diesels, War, and S.R.O.: In an all-out war, all-out Hi's

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pp. 72-83

September 20, 1941, will be inscribed forever in the history of the Hi for the arrival of the inevitable. That morning, No. 15, a 4000 h.p. product of Electro-Motive composed of two E-6 cab units, headed train 6 out of Minneapolis. ...

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Famous 15: The locomotive that sold the steam-powered Milwaukee Road on diesels

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pp. 84-89

The Class A Atlantics led the way and were in many respects the acme of high-speed passenger steam power. They were followed by the F-7 Hudsons which enabled train No. 6, the southbound Morning Hiawatha, to hold down what was perhaps the fastest regularly scheduled run ever made with steam power: ...

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Skytops and Super Domes: More diesels and enough new cars to make a 2½-mile Hi

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pp. 90-115

June 1946 brought additional 4000 h.p. two-unit EMD E7 passenger locomotives to the Chicago-Minneapolis service, bumping the last Hudsons from Hi's 5 and 100. As the 14 and 15 had been doing all along, the new locomotives made a daily round trip handling a standard train in one direction at night. ...

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Yellow Pain and Red Ink: For President Crippen, "an unhappy task"

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pp. 116-127

On October 30, 1955, the Milwaukee Road assumed operation of the Union Pacific's Challenger and City streamliners between Chicago and Council Bluffs. Some changes of train numbers were necessary to avoid duplication of the operating designations of the UP trains ...

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North Woods Hiawatha: The Hi that was the fisherman's friend

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pp. 128-139

The portion of the Milwaukee Road that extends from New Lisbon to Woodruff, Wis. (and once went beyond) has been incorporated into the La Crosse division for some 30 years. In the past it was the Wisconsin Valley division. ...

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Midwest Hiawatha: "The audacity to challenge entrenchments"

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pp. 140-155

Whatever else might be said about the Milwaukee Road's line between Chicago and Omaha, it possesses an uncanny ability to avoid centers of population. It misses Rockford, 111., and Dubuque and Des Moines, la., and scores a near-miss on Cedar Rapids, la., by running through adjacent Marion. ...

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Olympian Hiawatha: To fill a void, "a perfect train"

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pp. 156-187

When he victory of the Allies in World War II became evident, the visions of people and industries could turn again to peaceful ambitions. Trains in the United States not only were full, they were crowded — a circumstance that in most railway general offices brought optimism regarding the future of passenger traffic. ...

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Chippewa-Hiawatha: Where aging Pacifics dimmed their headlights for deer

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pp. 188-201

The Milwaukee's secondary main line from Milwaukee north into the upper peninsula of Michigan, like the Chicago-Omaha route, managed to bypass more communities of importance than it reached. In fact, with the exception of Green Bay, Wis., and Iron Mountain, Mich., none of the communities along the route surpassed the definition of a small town. ...

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Epilogue

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pp. 202-203

The ICC decision approving termination of the Afternoon Hiawatha was issued on January 21, 1970. Nos. 2 and 3 made their last trips on Friday, January 23, with a minimum of publicity and only a small amount of railfan activity. ...

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Way of the Hiawathas

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pp. 204-223

The route of the Hiawathas offers scenic and railfan interest. Chicago to Milwaukee is the first subdivision of the Milwaukee Division; Milwaukee to Hastings is the first, second, and third subdivisions of the La Crosse Division; Hastings (St. Croix Tower) to St. Paul is under the jurisdiction of the CMStP&P-CB&Q joint timetable; ...

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Locomotives

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pp. 224-257

The Milwaukee's most famous steam power, and certainly among the best known of all North American steam locomotives, was the Class A Hiawatha Atlantics. They were built to include all the latest in steam locomotive design in 1935. ...

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Rolling Stock

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pp. 258-265

This roster includes only cars constructed for Hiawatha trains. The Milwaukee Road built a number of other streamlined passenger cars and acquired some from outside builders for trains other than the Hiawathas, but these are not listed here, even though a few of them worked at some time or other on the Hiawathas. ...

Index

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pp. 266-267

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About the Author, Other Works by the Publisher

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Jim Scribbins is a retired Milwaukee Road executive. He lives in West Bend, Wisconsin. He is also the author of The 400 Story: Chicago & Northwestern's Premier Passenger Trains.