Cover

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Title Page, About the Series, Copyright

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

...Had it not been for the constant support and guidance of many people, I am sure that I would never have been able to complete this project, and I certainly would not have comprehended, as much as I have, the richness and complexities of the subculture I studied. I am especially thankful to the baseball card...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-15

...During the late 1980s and early part of 1990, I spent a great deal of time attending baseball card shows in the metropolitan area of a major city in the upper midwestern United States. It was not hard for me to locate a show to attend, as each week I could easily find groups of men and boys, sometimes accompanied...

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1. The Baseball Card Industry

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pp. 16-27

...magazine asserts that "serious" collectors increased from 4,000 to 250,000 during this time period, making baseball card collecting the fourth largest hobby in the nation. The number of annual shows increased as well, from twenty to six hundred...

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2. Venues of Exchange and Adult Collecting

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pp. 28-46

...provided a unique opportunity to examine how audiences participated in the use of "mass culture" commodities to produce a relatively grassroots form of popular culture. Perhaps the most public arenas I observed for such expression within the local baseball card collecting hobby were the regular shows...

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3. Collecting Sets

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pp. 47-74

...Midwest experienced their hobby both publicly and privately. It would be a profound understatement to say that no two collectors engaged with their cards in exactly the same way, yet there were noteworthy commonalities and trends in collecting behavior. One of the most important was the phenomenon of collecting...

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4. Adult Male Baseball Card Collecting, Nostalgia, and the Cultural Politics of Gender and Race during the 1970s and 1980s

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pp. 75-97

...present, one of the most striking is the 1972 issue. Unlike the predictably banal fronts of cards produced in many previous years, these had bright orange-and-yellow borders stylized to look like a 1930s movie marquee with team names exaggeratedly printed on the top border as if they were emerging toward...

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Conclusion

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pp. 98-120

...The epigraph, cited from sports journalist Luke Salisbury, refers to a common cliche that circulates among baseball card collectors: that mothers throw away their sons' baseball cards. Salisbury's passage and the cliche to which it refers illustrate some of the undeniable ways in which the nostalgic orientation of adult baseball card collecting is intricately linked to ideas about race, class...

Notes on Methodology

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pp. 121-126

Notes

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pp. 127-130

References

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pp. 131-136

Index

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pp. 137-142

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About the Author

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pp. 143-143

...American Studies at Dickinson College. His published work has examined sports as a popular culture phenomenon. He has drawn from the field of cultural studies to examine sports as a significant cultural location for the formation of subcultures, the exploration...