Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

Preface to the Paperback Edition

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xii

I began the preface of the 1992 edition of this book by noting, "Discovery is the expansive quality that pervaded my experience" in doing the fieldwork in the open landscape of the rural Upper Midwest. Now with the publication of the book in a paperback edition by the University of Minnesota Press I have a sense of coming home again. ...

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-4

The advent of balloon frame construction in the Upper Midwest fundamentally changed the way people conceived of and built structures with wood. Invented in Chicago in the early 18305, the popularity of balloon frame construction increased with each new wave of settlement of a predominantly agricultural region. ...

read more

1. The Balloon Frame Structural System

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 5-24

Balloon frame farmhouses are characteristic and important features of the upper midwestern rural landscape. Their simple shapes sharply defined and differentiated from their natural surroundings and their starkly white planar surfaces illuminated by the sun express qualities inherent in the structures and the way they were put together. ...

read more

2. A Typology for Balloon Frame Farmhouses in the Upper Midwest

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 25-39

Balloon frame farmhouses built in the Upper Midwest are of a bewildering variety. It appears as if each builder exploited the system's potential for creating a structure that was unique. Despite this great variety, it is possible to sort these farmhouses into discernible groups or types. ...

read more

3. Settlement and Shelter

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 40-60

Before balloon frame construction became the primary way to plan and realize houses on farms in the Upper Midwest, settlers built small shelters intended to last for a limited number of years. These temporary dwellings met basic needs with minimum resources and taught most settlers how to "make do" with essentials for survival. ...

read more

4. Farmhouse Types 1 and 2: What Makes a House a Home?

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 61-95

People who pioneered in the Upper Midwest from 1830 to 1920 experienced rapid and enormous changes in almost every aspect of their lives. They changed the physical environment from what they considered wilderness to a garden of productive farms. ...

read more

5. Farmhouse Types 3 and 4: A Vernacular Aesthetics

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 96-135

The most numerous and familiar farmhouse type in the Upper Midwest is the ell or T plan. Although farmers and carpenters built what seems an endless variety of these houses, many nostalgically recall them simply as "the house where Grandmother lived." ...

read more

6. Farmhouse Types 5 and 6: Style, Substance, and Community

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 136-173

The large number and wide variety of ell- and T-plan farmhouses in the Upper Midwest allow one to compare and judge levels of performance in vernacular building. Farmhouses of types 5 and 6 are fewer in number but are of such commanding scale, exhibit such classical balance, and display such appropriate use of ornament that most merit judgment as high-quality performances. ...

read more

7. Farmhouse Types 8 and 9: Consolidation and Standardization

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 174-213

The simple monumental shape and utilitarian floor plan of one- and two-story foursquare houses embodied values related to major national trends from the 1890s to the 1920s. After generations of expansion and growth, the nation turned toward consolidating natural and human resources. Means to process raw materials and manufacture products became standardized. ...

read more

8. Farmhouse Type 10: Rural Images of Success

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 214-240

A significant way in which farmers signaled their success was the planning and construction of houses that were evidence of their prosperity. Houses of this type would approximate the high style mansions one could admire in towns and cities. Most farmers' mansions, however, only approximated these urban models in scale, ...

read more

9. Conclusion: Bricks, Balloon Frames, and Hi-Tech

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 241-254

Builders adopted balloon frame construction in the rural areas of the Upper Midwest as an economical, adaptable, and easy method of building that met the demands of rapid growth in settlement and population that had resulted in an unprecedented need for domestic and commercial structures. ...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 255-272

Selected Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 273-288

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 289-296

read more

About the Author

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Fred W. Peterson is professor emeritus of art history at the University of Minnesota, Morris. He is the author of Keeping the Faith: German Catholic Vernacular Architecture in a Rural Minnesota Parish.