Cover

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p. Cover

Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-vii

The essays in this volume were originally delivered at Binghamton University in October 1995 at a conference entitled “Christine de Pizan: Texts/Intertexts/Contexts,” sponsored by the Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies with support from the Women’s Studies Program...

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Introduction: From Book-Lined Cell to Cyborg Hermeneutics

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pp. ix-xix

Donna Haraway’s cyborg myth points to the “transgressed boundaries, potent fusions and dangerous possibilities” of technology in the late twentieth century: “we are living through a movement from an organic, industrial society to a polymorphous, information system”...

Part I: The Belly of the Monster

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p. 1

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1. Christine de Pizan on the Art of Warfare

Charity Cannon Willard

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pp. 3-15

The series of letters written by Christine de Pizan during her participation in the quarrel over the Roman de la Rose call attention to her relations with government employees, notably the royal secretaries with whom her husband had been associated during his lifetime...

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2. Christine’s Anxious Lessons: Gender, Morality, and the Social Order from the Enseignemens to the Avision

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pp. 16-40

In the midst of her autobiographical portrait at the end of the Avision-Christine, Christine tells how Nature inspired her to strike the anvil with her own “outils” as productively as she had formerly engendered with her womb and how, between 1399 and the time of writing the Avision...

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3. “Douleur sur toutes autres”: Revisualizing the Rape Script in the Epistre Othea and the Cité des dames

Diane Wolfthal

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pp. 41-70

Roy Porter recently argued that rape was not on the minds of pre-industrial women and that feminist scholars should not project their concern with rape onto the past (221). Indeed, Johan Huizinga’s classic account of late medieval culture, Herfsttij der middeleeuwen (The Autumn of the Middle Ages), seems to lend support to Porter’s assertion...

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4. Christine de Pizan and the Authority of Experience

Mary Anne C. Case

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pp. 71-87

Christine de Pizan and the Querelle des femmes tradition of which she forms a part have much to contribute to ongoing debates in feminist jurisprudence. Her condemnation of the Roman de la Rose, for example, is an important precursor of the MacKinnon-Dworkin...

Part II: Situated Knowledges

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p. 89

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5. “Perdre son latin”: Christine de Pizan and Vernacular Humanism

Thelma Fenster

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pp. 91-107

Recent criticism on Christine de Pizan has renewed an earlier query: did Christine know Latin, and if so, how well? In part, however, the question invites worn-out conclusions about men and Latin, women and the vernacular and the oral, and in the end we may wonder...

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6. The Critique of Knowledge as Power: The Limits of Philosophy and Theology in Christine de Pizan

Benjamin M. Semple

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pp. 108-127

As a late medieval woman author composing her works in the vernacular, Christine de Pizan is not necessarily a writer we would expect to have taken part in philosophical or theological speculation. In several significant ways, she lacked the requisite “qualifications”...

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7. The Bath of the Muses and Visual Allegory in the Chemin de long estude

Mary Weitzel Gibbons

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pp. 128-145

Although Christine de Pizan studies have exploded in the past twenty years, textual interpretations of her oeuvre have far exceeded attention to the visual images as they interact with the texts.1 Recently, however, a few scholars, such as Sandra Hindman, have...

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8. “Traittié tout de mençonges”: The Secrés des dames, “Trotula,” and Attitudes toward Women’s Medicine in Fourteenth- and Early-Fifteenth-Century France

Monica H. Green

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pp. 146-178

In a brief exchange with Lady Reason early in the Livre de la cité des dames, Christine de Pizan turns to one of the common themes in medieval misogynistic rhetoric: the vile or deformed nature of the female body. So defective is the female body that Nature herself is ashamed...

Part III: Engendering Authorship

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p. 179

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9. Transforming Ovid: The Metamorphosis of Female Authority

Judith L. Kellogg

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pp. 181-194

The standard view of Ovid in the Middle Ages was that he was love’s inspired clerk. Chaucer describes him as “Venus clerk, Ovide, / That hath ysowen wonder wide / The grete god of Loves name” (“House of Fame” lines 1487–89).1 Christine de Pizan, however, voice...

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10. What Is a Patron? Benefactors and Authorship in Harley 4431, Christine de Pizan’s Collected Works

Deborah McGrady

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pp. 195-214

Around 1411, Christine de Pizan presented the queen of France, Isabeau of Bavaria, with an exquisite manuscript copy of her courtly and didactic works (British Library, Harley 4431). Containing thirty texts and decorated with 130 miniatures, this anthology constitutes...

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11. The Reconstruction of an Author in Print: Christine de Pizan in the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries

Cynthia J. Brown

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pp. 215-235

In 1488, Antoine Vérard published the Livre des fais d’armes et de chevalerie, the first of Christine de Pizan’s texts to be printed in France. The author, however, would not have recognized her own work at first glance. Not only was the title altered to read the Art de chevalerie selon Vegece,1

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12. Arms and the Bride: Christine de Pizan’s Military Treatise as a Wedding Gift for Margaret of Anjou

Michel-André Bossy

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pp. 236-256

Manuscript Royal 15.E.VI in the British Library is a gift that Queen Margaret of Anjou received in 1445 from John Talbot, first earl of Shrewsbury, on the occasion of her marriage to Henry VI of England. The book is a compilation of narrative texts and treatises, all...

Works Cited

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pp. 257-277

Contributors

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pp. 279-280

Index

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pp. 281-287