Cover

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Title Page, About the Series, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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p. vii

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Preface and Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

At a time when the United States is renewing its ties to its own imperial past and making peace with itself, it becomes imperative to review certain genderedconstructions and expressions of its national identity from early twentieth-century popular culture that government officials and the media are seeking to revive today. Gender on Ice examines the powerful...

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Introduction: A Passion for Blankness: U.S. and British Polar Discourse

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pp. 1-14

In Joseph Conrad's Heart of DarknessOn his return from the North Pole in 1909, explorer Robert Peary at his first opportunity sent messages to announce his success. Peary's cables went to the New York Times, to the Associated Press, to the secretary of the Peary Arctic Club, and the following to President William Howard Taft., Marlow, while writing about Africa, brings in an unexpected reference to the North Pole: Now when I was a little chap I had a passion for maps. I would look for hours at South America, or Africa...

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1. Nationalism on Ice: Technology and Masculinity at the North Pole

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pp. 15-56

On his return from the North Pole in 1909, explorer Robert Peary at his first opportunity sent messages to announce his success. Peary's cables went to the New York Times, to the Associated Press, to the secretary of the Peary Arctic Club, and the following to President William Howard Taft...

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2. National Geographic Society and Magazine: Technologies of Nationalism, Race, and Gender

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pp. 57-82

Theorists of nationalism such as Benedict Anderson argue that the spread of print culture during the early 1800s in Europe was central to constituting new national identities.1 As Anderson points out, the modernity of nationalism can be seen in the peculiar way that novels, newspapers, and magazines provided a common language that enabled people to form...

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3. White Fade-out? Heroism and the National Geographic in the Age of Multiculturalism

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pp. 83-110

Much of National Geographic's history and discourse turns on the question of "whiteness" as an unmarked category. Now, white values still inform the cultural practices and policies of institutions such as the National Geographic. Though white power and dominance is hard to grasp, one of the ways it makes itself felt is by the way white institutions pass themselves...

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4. Science and Writing: Two Adventures of Male Embodiment

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pp. 111-136

The British were the losers in the race to the South Pole. Roald Amundsen of Norway reached the pole in 1911, one month ahead of the hapless Capt. Robert Falcon Scott. Not only did the British team fail to reach the pole first, but Scott and his four men died of hunger and cold on their way back. After completing nearly seven-eighths of the distance they encountered..

Notes

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pp. 137-148

Bibliography

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pp. 149-158

Index

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pp. 159-163