Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Foreword

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In the spring of 1924 the Committee on Educational Research of the University of Minnesota authorized the appointment of a subcommittee on extra-curricular activities. Faculty interest in the problem of evaluating the social and educational aspects of student extra-curricular activities had been crystallized in a memorandum drawn up by Dr. William Anderson, Professor of Political Science. ...

Table of Contents

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pp. v-vi

List of Tables

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pp. vii-x

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Chapter I. Introduction

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pp. 1-5

The purpose of this study is to describe the social and educational aspects of extra-curricular activities of students at the University of Minnesota. Before making the preliminary preparations for this study, articles that had been written on the general subject of extra-curricular activities were examined and classified. ...

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Chapter II. Student Extra-Curricular Organizations on the Campus

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pp. 6-16

To secure data on the extra-curricular organizations existing on the campus at the University of Minnesota in 1924-25, a questionnaire (see Appendix II) was prepared and sent to each of these organizations. All together, 306 organizations were listed in the files of the Dean of Student Affairs and each of these organizations was circularized. ...

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Chapter III. Student Participation in Different Types of Activity

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pp. 17-36

In Chapter II the vitality and survival of different kinds of campus organizations was discussed. In this chapter our task is to present the facts of student participation1 in each type of activity. In what numbers and percentages do students participate in athletics, fraternities, musical organizations, earning money, and so on through the whole list of twenty-two different types of activity? ...

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Chapter IV. Distribution of Students According to Number of Activities in Which They Participate

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pp. 37-46

In order to discover how the students were distributed according to the number of activities in which they participated, the following procedure was used: first, the 4,637 questionnaires were grouped according to the different colleges represented by the students. Then the questionnaires were again divided into the four classes, freshman, sophomore, junior, and senior.1 ...

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Chapter V. Student Leaders: A Study of Prominent and Honor Students and Officers

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pp. 47-63

The questionnaires that were sent to each student organization on the campus contained a request to list the ten most active or prominent members in that particular organization. In this way we hoped to be able to make a separate tabulation of students who were especially prominent on the campus according to the judgment of the students themselves. ...

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Chapter VI. Student Activity and Academic Achievement

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pp. 64-78

In the preceding chapters we have considered the participation of students in extra-curricular activities of different kinds, but the relation of these activities to academic achievement was not studied because comparable data could not be obtained on such a large scale. Observers of student activity have held different opinions regarding the effects of extreme participation on study and academic achievement. ...

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Chapter VII. The Time Students Spend on Activities

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pp. 79-89

In addition to indicating on the questionnaire activities in which they took part, the students were also requested to indicate how much time they spent on each activity per quarter.1 A large number of students failed to do this, and those who did fill out the number of hours spent on each activity necessarily had to give estimates only, ...

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Chapter VIII. The Carry-Over of Student Activities into Corresponding Community Activities of Alumni

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pp. 90-110

Do students active in extra-curricular affairs tend to apply their talent for participation or their habits of social activity acquired in student days to the affairs of after life, and as alumni participate in organized social groups more actively than do students who were inactive when in college? ...

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Chapter IX. General Conclusions

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pp. 111-118

Such a mass of complicated statistical data has been presented in the preceding chapters that a general summary of conclusions seems desirable if we are to appreciate the social and educational significance of this survey. ...

Bibliography

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pp. 119-126

Appendixes

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pp. 127-140