Cover

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Title Page, About the Series, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. viii-x

My sincere thanks go to all those who assisted in the writing and publication of this book. Apart from the many friends and colleagues—too many to name—whose comments and suggestions were most welcome encouragements to its development, ...

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1. The Dorsal Turn

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pp. 2-23

The arguments mobilized here, indeed, that mobilize themselves here, do so in the service of what might be called a “technological turn.” I employ the contrived reflexivity of the syntagm “mobilize themselves” to emphasize the ineluctable effect of a certain mechanicity or automaticity. ...

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2. Facades of the Other: Heidegger, Althusser, Levinas

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pp. 24-65

Throughout his 1949 lecture “The Turning,” Heidegger elaborates the relation of technology to the question of Being that he had introduced with his notion of enframing (Gestell) in “The Question concerning Technology.” In the latter essay, as is well known, he develops a distinction between the artifact that is produced via an ideology of causality and instrumentality, ...

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3. No One Home: Homer, Joyce, Broch

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pp. 66-101

The stressed and distended subject in Levinas finds its echo and, as I have argued, its condition of possibility in a house that is similarly an “abandon of all shelter, exposure to traumas, vulnerability.” A house that creates an interiority for the formation of a subject, but only to thereafter ease that subject (via the feminine) into—and finally expose it more radically to—relations with the outside element, ...

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4. A Line Drawn in the Ocean: Exodus, Freud, Rimbaud

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pp. 102-131

Joyce’s 1904 three-master homes to Dublin, back to what were called the British Isles, even if the island in question was home to an Ireland that often and justifiably marked itself as recalcitrantly non-British. The ships home nevertheless to a type of or piece of Europe. ...

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5. Friendship in Torsion: Schmitt, Derrida

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pp. 132-161

Carl Schmitt’s line of 1927, however specific to post-1648 Europe, is drawn as if straight from the mythology of the Red Sea, defining “the specific political distinction” as an “antithesis” of friend and enemy: ...

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6. Revolutions in the Darkroom: Balázs, Benjamin, Sade

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pp. 162-205

We have come to accept the limitations of photographic representation. But that wasn’t always so. Béla Balázs believed that “close-ups are often dramatic revelations of what is really happening under the surface of appearances. . . . the faces of things. . . . The closeups of the film are the creative instruments of [a] mighty visual anthropomorphism. ...

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7. The Controversy of Dissidence: Nietzsche

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pp. 206-243

Zarathustra, no doubt otherwise unlike Dolmancé, has his own moment of discursive demurral. As evening falls in section 2 of “The Other Dance Song,” near the end of the third part of Nietzsche’s text, Zarathustra is conversing with, or rather provoking, Life, expressing his love-hate relationship to her, threatening to have her dance to the tune of his whip. ...

Notes

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pp. 244-263

Illustration Credits

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pp. 264-265

Index

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pp. 266-269

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About the Author

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David Wills is professor of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures and of English at the University at Albany, State University of New York. He is the author of several books, including Prosthesis and Matchbook. ...