Cover

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About the Series, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Preface

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pp. ix-xiv

Digital Baroque. What happens when two nouns, “the digital” and “the Baroque,” are conjoined without articles to anchor them: digital/Baroque? Does the one, “digital,” play the qualifying adjective to the weightier noun, “Baroque”? ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xv-xviii

A central feature of the Baroque is the accumulation of fragments of texts and bits of conversation whose proliferation provides the seeds of emergent discourse. I am particularly indebted to Tom Conley, Mitchell Greenberg, Patty Zimmermann, David Rodowick, Anne-Marie Duguet, ...

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Introduction: Baroque Folds and Digital Incompossibilities

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pp. 1-32

A few years ago I helped to pen a grant for a U.S./UK initiative in digital libraries. My charge was to articulate the digital transformation of the library in terms of its impact on the humanities. For this purpose I turned to tropes from visual studies to characterize the library’s role in humanistic research and contemplation. ...

I. From Video Black to Digital Baroque

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1. Digital Baroque: Performative Passage from Hatoum to Viola

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pp. 35-57

Consider the technological intensification of cinema as it moves into the twenty-first century. Advances in digital technology have spawned a sharp increase in the quantity and quality of multimedia production: video and digital installations, sound and light shows, multimedia dance, virtual reality performances, interactive CD/DVD-ROMs, Internet art. ...

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2. Et in Arcadia Video: Poussin’ the Image of Culture with Thierry Kuntzel and Louis Marin

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pp. 58-82

Those readers familiar with Louis Marin’s extensive writings on the semiology of art will recognize my title’s pun on one of his favorite images, Nicolas Poussin’s pastoral elegy Et in Arcadia Ego, a painting that Marin analyzes in detail in To Destroy Painting and throughout his extensive oeuvre. ...

II. Digital Deleuze: Baroque Folds of Shakespearean Passage

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3. The Crisis of Cinema in the Age of New World-Memory: The Baroque Legacy of Jean-Luc Godard

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pp. 85-110

We have seen throughout the preceding chapters how Gilles Deleuze borrows in The Fold from the late twentieth century to visualize the curvilinear patterns of thought that distinguish Leibniz’s “folds” from Descartes’ “lines.” ...

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4. You Are How You Read: Baroque Chao-Errancy in Greenaway and Deleuze

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pp. 111-134

As if the epitome of the Baroque, The Tempest by Shakespeare has been cited as a case history of the negative legacy of capitalism. Postcolonial readings situate the play’s “brave new world” on the fold of the rise of the new economic order. ...

III. Present Past: Digitality, Psychoanalysis, and the Memory of Cinema

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5. Digitality and the Memory of Cinema: Bearing the Losses of the Digital Code

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pp. 137-158

Two overlapping curatorial projects in the late 1990s catalyzed this section’s reflections on the “return” of cinema in the digital age. For the 1997 Flaherty Seminar, I cocurated with Patricia R. Zimmermann a selection of work by film and video artists who were experimenting with digital technology on platforms other than film. ...

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6. Wounds of Repetition in the Age of the Digital: Chris Marker’s Cinematic Ghosts

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pp. 159-177

The dead are expunged from the memory of those who live on. While such a theorization of ghosting does not represent the artistic strategies of either Daniel Reeves or Grace Quintanilla, it is a fitting description of at least one cinematic and psychiatric approach to trauma and its aftermath. ...

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7. Philosophical Toys and Kaleidoscopes of the Unfamiliar: The Haunting Voices of Toni Dove and Zoe Belo

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pp. 178-194

When Verena Andermatt Conley published these words in 1993, she couldn’t have foreseen the extensive developments in new media art through which viewers might be haunted by the loops and fades of works such as Viola’s Going Forth by Day and Piper’s Relocating the Remains. ...

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8. Digital Incompossibility: Cruising the Aesthetic Haze of New Media

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pp. 195-214

The “interactivity” of digital aesthetics is commonly understood to shift the ground of the artistic project away from “representation” and toward “virtualization,” away from “resemblance” and toward “simulation.” Rather than celebrate the art object’s imitation of nature, its adherence to well-established artistic genres such as still life, landscape, or portraiture that set the parameters of “resemblance,” ...

IV. Scanning the Future

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9. Psychic Scansion: The Marker of the Digital In-Between

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pp. 217-237

Wedged between two wars, Chris Marker passed his youth like a propped-up tome crushed by the weight of two historical bookends. This was a period that marked not only the representational trauma of youthful passage for a boy who later moved so fluidly between photography, cinema, and new media, ...

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10. Time @ Cinema’s Future: New Media Art and the Thought of Temporality

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pp. 238-260

We need only position the imprint of new media on the future of cinema to appreciate the depth of the maxim voiced by that philosophical icon of American pop culture, Yogi Berra. While Yogi isn’t likely to have had the ontology of cinema in mind when he mused about the paradox of time’s traveling, his famous quotation certainly seems like an apt epigraph for this concluding chapter on the temporal folds of Digital Baroque. ...

Notes

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pp. 261-290

Publication History

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pp. 291-292

Index

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pp. 293-309