In this Book

University of Minnesota Press
summary
In this intellectually groundbreaking work, Timothy Murray investigates a paradox embodied in the book’s title: What is the relationship between digital, in the form of new media art, and baroque, a highly developed early modern philosophy of art? Making an exquisite and unexpected connection between the old and the new, Digital Baroque analyzes the philosophical paradigms that inform contemporary screen arts. Examining a wide range of art forms, Murray reflects on the rhetorical, emotive, and social forces inherent in the screen arts’ dialogue with early modern concepts. Among the works discussed are digitally oriented films by Peter Greenaway, Jean-Luc Godard, and Chris Marker; video installations by Thierry Kuntzel, Keith Piper, and Renate Ferro; and interactive media works by Toni Dove, David Rokeby, and Jill Scott. Sophisticated readings reveal the electronic psychosocial webs and digital representations that link text, film, and computer. Murray puts forth an innovative Deleuzian psychophilosophical approach—one that argues that understanding new media art requires a fundamental conceptual shift from linear visual projection to nonlinear temporal folds intrinsic to the digital form.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. About the Series, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Preface
  2. pp. ix-xiv
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xv-xviii
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Introduction: Baroque Folds and Digital Incompossibilities
  2. pp. 1-32
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. I. From Video Black to Digital Baroque
  2. pp. 33-34
  1. 1. Digital Baroque: Performative Passage from Hatoum to Viola
  2. pp. 35-57
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 2. Et in Arcadia Video: Poussin’ the Image of Culture with Thierry Kuntzel and Louis Marin
  2. pp. 58-82
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. II. Digital Deleuze: Baroque Folds of Shakespearean Passage
  2. pp. 83-84
  1. 3. The Crisis of Cinema in the Age of New World-Memory: The Baroque Legacy of Jean-Luc Godard
  2. pp. 85-110
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 4. You Are How You Read: Baroque Chao-Errancy in Greenaway and Deleuze
  2. pp. 111-134
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. III. Present Past: Digitality, Psychoanalysis, and the Memory of Cinema
  2. pp. 135-136
  1. 5. Digitality and the Memory of Cinema: Bearing the Losses of the Digital Code
  2. pp. 137-158
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 6. Wounds of Repetition in the Age of the Digital: Chris Marker’s Cinematic Ghosts
  2. pp. 159-177
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 7. Philosophical Toys and Kaleidoscopes of the Unfamiliar: The Haunting Voices of Toni Dove and Zoe Belo
  2. pp. 178-194
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 8. Digital Incompossibility: Cruising the Aesthetic Haze of New Media
  2. pp. 195-214
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. IV. Scanning the Future
  2. pp. 215-216
  1. 9. Psychic Scansion: The Marker of the Digital In-Between
  2. pp. 217-237
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 10. Time @ Cinema’s Future: New Media Art and the Thought of Temporality
  2. pp. 238-260
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Notes
  2. pp. 261-290
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Publication History
  2. pp. 291-292
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Index
  2. pp. 293-309
  3. restricted access Download |
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.