Cover

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Title Page, Other Works in the Series, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Foreword: The Unpredictable Creativity of David Noble

George Lipsitz

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pp. ix-xviii

...nation and its collective imagination. Like most historians, he concerns himself with change over time, with what can be learned once we realize that part of “what things are” lies in “how they came to be.” But...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xix-xxii

...of my intellectual identity. My grandmothers planted seeds of doubt in my mind about the metaphor of a European Old World and an American New World. My mothers, as they struggled to hold the...

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Introduction: Space Travels

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pp. xxiii-xlvi

...in a scholarly revolution that, for them, had begun in the 1960s. At that point, American studies as an academic discipline was only thirty years old. The 1960s revolutionists, as the contributors saw them in 2000, were...

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ONE: The Birth and Death of American History

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pp. 48-84

...tradition that moved from Renaissance Italy into the English colonies. Now, in this book, I am placing this theory that time and space are dichotomies within the transatlantic bourgeois culture, which, by...

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TWO: Historians Leaving Home, Killing Fathers

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pp. 85-125

...in 1968, he described it as an act of parricide. He believed that he had cut himself off from the historians who were most important to him in the 1930s, the literary historian Vernon Lewis Parrington as well as Turner...

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THREE: The Crisis of American Literary Criticism from World War I to World War II

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pp. 126-152

...of the Appalachian Mountains. The suddenness of this change in the aesthetic foundations of national identity is symbolically dramatized by whom the members of the Mississippi Valley Historical Association...

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FOUR: Elegies for the National Landscape

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pp. 153-175

...the Minnesota English department and give intellectual substance to the new American Studies Program. But perhaps because the United States, once again, was committed to war in Europe in 1941, McDowell...

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FIVE: The New Literary Criticism: The Death of the Nation Born in New England

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pp. 176-197

...landscapes. These landscapes were given substance as the variety of artists gave them representation. The orthodoxy of modern nationalism insisted that the purpose of art was to represent the recently discovered and...

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SIX: The Vanishing National Landscape: Painting, Architecture,Music, and Philosophy in the Early Twentieth Century

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pp. 198-261

...beautiful. The promise of bourgeois nationalism that national landscapes could produce such an organic art was shattered in the 1940s. The Marxist promise that the urban-industrial...

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SEVEN: The Disintegration of National Boundaries: Literary Criticism in the Late Twentieth Century

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pp. 262-296

...Program. I believe this participation was crucial to the development of my focus on the role of a concept of space for the dominant culture. In contact with colleagues and graduate students who were interested in...

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EIGHT: The End of American History

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pp. 297-333

...to the crisis of bourgeois nationalism in the United States in a dramatically different way than did our contemporaries who taught American literature—the symbol-myth school and the New Literary...

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Epilogue

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pp. 334-349

...The story I have told about the triumph of cultural anthropology in the writing of literary criticism and history since the 1960s is filled with irony. In contrast to these academic cultures, the dominant political...

Notes

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pp. 350-383

Index

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pp. 384-399

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About the Author

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pp. 400-400

...David W. Noble is professor of American studies at the University of Minnesota. He has written several books, including...