Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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p. ix

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Preface

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pp. xi-xxii

This book attempts to look at the productive possibilities of Mikhail Bakhtin's theory of dialogism for an analysis of "subaltern" writing. Rather than assume subaltern subjectivity as forever the concern of what has been derisively called "victim studies," a dialogic approach emphasizes the cultural agency of the oppressed and also shows what political implications this might...

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Acknowledgments

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p. xxiii

Of course, a work like this is always more collaborative than the single name that appears on its cover implies, but it is not quite the collective authoring that this author has in mind. Nevertheless, there are many people who have had a hand in the writing of this book and here I will mention a few of them. I would like to thank the folks over at the Professional...

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1. Dialogics of the Oppressed: Theorizing the Subaltern Subject

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pp. 1-24

I wish to consider the following formulation for its possible contradictions and potential solidarity. The dialogics of the oppressed trace a theoretical space in which cultural criticism in particular and the (Western) academy in general articulates the voices of the marginal, the subaltern, and the dispossessed. It is not, however, a methodology that rationalizes and codifies a pregiven object of analysis, and in this way it not only...

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2. Firdaus; or, The Politics of Positioning

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pp. 25-52

Is not any "Western" consideration of the feminist work of Nawal el Saadawi, and in particular one by the Western male, bound, by its very point of reference, to reproduce a hegemonic rendering of the colonial subject? Is not the very voice of "Western" criticism an unequal exchange of articulation, explication, for "silence," real or imagined? Specifically, is not...

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3. Radical Writing

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pp. 53-82

In his analysis of the work of George Eliot, Raymond Williams discusses the concept of a "knowable community," the tension between the voice of the educated observer and the lived relations described.1 The success of the narrative depends not on the sublimation of the one by the other, but on the ways in which the dynamism of both is preserved and empowered...

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4. The Ark of Desire

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pp. 83-127

The following notes on Zhang Jie are predicated on three disparate butrelated moments in the contemporary ethos: (1) the moment of literarytheory in the discursive structures of (primarily) "Western" culturalcritique; (2) the moment of revolution in Chinese history (which, con-trary to most reports regarding June 4,1989, has scarcely begun); and...

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5. The Other Agnes

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pp. 128-169

On November 12, 1923, in a letter to her friend Florence Lennon, Agnes Smedley wrote: You say . . . that although girls should not be feebleminded, they should not attempt to take the place of men in nature. I answer this: I do not know just what woman's "place in nature" happens to be, except sexually—that "place" is quite clearly marked out. But as to socially, I do not know but that nature has been mauled over the head by men, and woman...

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6. Translation Relations

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pp. 170-202

Translators are the unacknowledged legislators of the world. Can Shelley's revolutionary zeal for the poet in the nineteenth century be reinvested in the task of the translator for the twentieth and beyond? The function of translation and the role of the translator go to the heart of what is meant by the "dialogics of the oppressed." I wish to consider the translator as something considerably more than the conduit between languages...

Notes

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pp. 203-228

Selected Bibliography

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pp. 229-238

Index

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pp. 239-244

About the Author

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pp. 245-245